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Finance And The Poor




The operation of the formal financial system is profoundly important for the poor. Financial development influences the degree to which economic opportunities are shaped by talent rather than by parental wealth. Considerably more research is needed on which formal financial sector policies boost aggregate economic efficiency, while simultaneously expanding the economic prospects of the poor. Copyright © 2008 The Author. Journal compilation © 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and The University of Manchester.

Suggested Citation

  • Ross Levine, 2008. "Finance And The Poor," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 76(s1), pages 1-13, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:manchs:v:76:y:2008:i:s1:p:1-13

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Galor, Oded & Tsiddon, Daniel, 1997. "Technological Progress, Mobility, and Economic Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(3), pages 363-382, June.
    2. Oded Galor & Joseph Zeira, 1993. "Income Distribution and Macroeconomics," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 60(1), pages 35-52.
    3. Robert M. Townsend & Kenichi Ueda, 2003. "Financial Deepening, Inequality, and Growth; A Model-Based Quantitative Evaluation," IMF Working Papers 03/193, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Loury, Glenn C, 1981. "Intergenerational Transfers and the Distribution of Earnings," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(4), pages 843-867, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Muhammad Shahbaz, 2013. "Financial Development, Economics Growth, Income Inequality Nexus: A Case Study of Pakistan," International Journal of Economics and Empirical Research (IJEER), The Economics and Social Development Organization (TESDO), vol. 1(3), pages 24-47, March.
    2. Muhammad, Shahbaz, 2011. "Electricity Consumption, Financial Development and Economic Growth Nexus: A Revisit Study of Their Causality in Pakistan," MPRA Paper 35588, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 27 Dec 2011.
    3. Shiyuan Pan, 2013. "Financial intermediation in a model of directed technological change," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 11(4), pages 535-553, December.
    4. Guivanna Aguilar, 2011. "Microcrédito Y Crecimiento Regional En El Perú," Documentos de Trabajo / Working Papers 2011-317, Departamento de Economía - Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú.
    5. Asian Development Bank Institute, 2015. "Asian Development Outlook 2015 Financing Asia’s Future Growth," Working Papers id:6666, eSocialSciences.
    6. Raju Jan Singh & Yifei Huang, 2016. "Financial Channels, Property Rights and Poverty: A Sub-Saharan African Perspective This work was initiated when Raju Jan Singh was a Senior Economist and Yifei Huang a summer intern at the African Dep," Economic Notes, Banca Monte dei Paschi di Siena SpA, vol. 45(3), pages 327-351, November.
    7. Aniruddha Mitra & James Bang & Phanindra Wunnava, 2014. "Financial liberalization and the selection of emigrants: a cross-national analysis," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 47(1), pages 199-226, August.

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