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Financial Deepening, Inequality, and Growth: A Model-Based Quantitative Evaluation -super-1


  • Robert M. Townsend
  • Kenichi Ueda


We propose a coherent unified approach to the study of the linkages among economic growth, financial structure, and inequality, bringing together disparate theoretical and empirical literature. That is, we show how to conduct model-based quantitative research on transitional paths. With analytical and numerical methods, we calibrate and make tractable a prototype canonical model and take it to an application, namely, Thailand 1976–1996, an emerging market economy in a phase of economic expansion with uneven financial deepening and increasing inequality. We look at the expected path generated by the model and conduct robustness experiments. Because the actual path of the Thai economy is imagined here to be just one realization of many possible histories of the model economy, we construct a covariance-normalized squared error metric of closeness and find the best-fit simulation. We also construct a confidence region from a set of simulations and formally test the model. We broadly replicate the actual data and identify anomalies. Copyright 2006, Wiley-Blackwell.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert M. Townsend & Kenichi Ueda, 2006. "Financial Deepening, Inequality, and Growth: A Model-Based Quantitative Evaluation -super-1," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 73(1), pages 251-293.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:restud:v:73:y:2006:i:1:p:251-293

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    1. Eric W. Bond & James Tybout & Hale Utar, 2015. "Credit Rationing, Risk Aversion, And Industrial Evolution In Developing Countries," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 56, pages 695-722, August.
    2. Alex Trew, 2012. "Contracting Institutions and Development," Review of Economics and Institutions, Università di Perugia, vol. 3(3).
    3. Trew, Alex, 2008. "Efficiency, depth and growth: Quantitative implications of finance and growth theory," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 1550-1568, December.
    4. Laurent Augier & Wahyoe Soedarmono, 2011. "Threshold Effect and Financial Intermediation in Economic Development," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 31(1), pages 342-357.
    5. Assunção, Juliano, 2013. "Eliminating entry barriers for the provision of banking services: Evidence from ‘banking correspondents’ in Brazil," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(8), pages 2806-2811.
    6. Jeremy Greenwood & Juan M. Sanchez & Cheng Wang, 2010. "Financing Development: The Role of Information Costs," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(4), pages 1875-1891, September.
    7. Nolan Charles & Trew Alex, 2015. "Transaction Costs and Institutions: Investments in Exchange," The B.E. Journal of Theoretical Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 15(2), pages 391-432, July.
    8. Donatella, Baiardi & Claudio, Morana, 2015. "Financial deepening and income distribution inequality in the euro area," Working Papers 316, University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Economics, revised 04 Dec 2015.
    9. Asli Demirgüç-Kunt & Ross Levine, 2009. "Finance and Inequality: Theory and Evidence," Annual Review of Financial Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 1(1), pages 287-318, November.
    10. Hyeok Jeong & Robert Townsend, 2007. "Sources of TFP growth: occupational choice and financial deepening," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 32(1), pages 179-221, July.
    11. Alvaro Aguirre, 2017. "Contracting Institutions and Economic Growth," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 24, pages 192-217, March.
    12. Nolan, Charles & Trew, Alex, 2011. "Transaction Costs and Institutions," SIRE Discussion Papers 2011-11, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).
    13. Karlan, Dean & Morduch, Jonathan, 2010. "Access to Finance," Handbook of Development Economics, Elsevier.
    14. Kim, Dong-Hyeon & Lin, Shu-Chin, 2011. "Nonlinearity in the financial developmentâincome inequality nexus," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 310-325, September.
    15. Ziv Chinzara & Radhika Lahiri, 2012. "Economic growth and inequality patterns in the presence of costly technology adoption and uncertainty," School of Economics and Finance Discussion Papers and Working Papers Series 280, School of Economics and Finance, Queensland University of Technology.
    16. Ziv Chinzara & Radhika Lahiri, 2012. "Financial Intermediation and Costly Technology Adoption under Uncertainty: A Political Economy Perspective," School of Economics and Finance Discussion Papers and Working Papers Series 295, School of Economics and Finance, Queensland University of Technology.
    17. Fulford, Scott L., 2013. "The effects of financial development in the short and long run: Theory and evidence from India," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 104(C), pages 56-72.
    18. Markus Brückner & Kerstin Gerling & Hans Grüner, 2010. "Wealth inequality and credit markets: evidence from three industrialized countries," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 15(2), pages 155-176, June.
    19. Mattana, Elena & Panetti, Ettore, 2012. "Bank Liquidity, Market Participation, and Economic Growth," MPRA Paper 43800, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Nov 2012.
    20. Benjamin Moll, 2009. "Creditor Rights, Inequality and Development in a Neoclassical Growth Model," 2009 Meeting Papers 1168, Society for Economic Dynamics.

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