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Social inclusion and altruism: empirical evidence from juvenile rehabilitation in Italy

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Listed:
  • Martina Menon
  • Federico Perali
  • Marcella Veronesi

Abstract

Social inclusion is a multidimensional phenomenon that involves social, political, and economic aspects of individuals' life. While social inclusion is a priority of the European Agenda 2020, little is known about individuals' preferences for social inclusion and its relationship with altruism. We exploit the marked cultural and socio-economic differences between North and South of Italy to investigate the relationship between people's preferences for the social inclusion of juvenile offenders and parental and non-parental altruism using a unique and large household survey. Between North and South of Italy, we do not find policy relevant differences in terms of social inclusion but, interestingly, we find that the altruistic motives are significantly different.

Suggested Citation

  • Martina Menon & Federico Perali & Marcella Veronesi, 2015. "Social inclusion and altruism: empirical evidence from juvenile rehabilitation in Italy," CHILD Working Papers Series 34, Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic Economics (CHILD) - CCA.
  • Handle: RePEc:cca:wchild:34
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Silvio Ciappi & Elena Dalla Chiara & Federico Perali & Barbara Santagata, 2015. "A Method to Measure Standard Costs of Juvenile Justice Systems: the example of Italy," Working Papers 15/2015, University of Verona, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Social inclusion; altruism; juvenile crime; rehabilitation.;

    JEL classification:

    • D61 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Allocative Efficiency; Cost-Benefit Analysis
    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement
    • D64 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Altruism; Philanthropy; Intergenerational Transfers

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