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Corporate governance, stake-holding and the nature of employment relations within the firm

Author

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  • Suzanne Konzelmann
  • Neil Conway
  • Linda Trenberth
  • Frank Wilkinson

Abstract

This paper investigates the effect of different forms of corporate governance on the structure and nature of stakeholder relationships within organizations and the consequent impact on employment relations within the firm. In this, HRM assumes a dual role in delivering improvements in production efficiency and in fostering employee commitment to the organization and its objectives. However, different forms of corporate governance prioritise stakeholder interests in ways that may bring these two objectives into conflict. To address these questions, we examine the interrelationship between corporate governance, HRM practices and HRM outcomes in a comparative analysis of companies operating under alternative forms of governance, including private sector, public sector and family-owned firms. The empirical analysis is based on the UK Work and Employment Relations Survey (WERS98).

Suggested Citation

  • Suzanne Konzelmann & Neil Conway & Linda Trenberth & Frank Wilkinson, 2005. "Corporate governance, stake-holding and the nature of employment relations within the firm," Working Papers wp313, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.
  • Handle: RePEc:cbr:cbrwps:wp313
    Note: PRO-2
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Sandra E. Black & Lisa M. Lynch, 2001. "How To Compete: The Impact Of Workplace Practices And Information Technology On Productivity," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 83(3), pages 434-445, August.
    2. Smith, Suzanne Konzelmann, 1995. "Internal Cooperation and Competitive Success: The Case of the U.S. Steel Minimill Sector," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 19(2), pages 277-304, April.
    3. Catherine Truss, 2001. "Complexities and Controversies in Linking HRM with Organizational Outcomes," Journal of Management Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 38(8), pages 1121-1149, December.
    4. Wilkinson, Frank, 1983. "Productive Systems," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 7(3-4), pages 413-429, September.
    5. Michael J. Handel & Maury Gittleman, 1999. "Is There a Wage Payoff to Innovative Work Practices?," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_288, Levy Economics Institute.
    6. Suzanne Konzelmann & Frank Wilkinson & Maria Hudson, 2002. "Partnership in Practice," Working Papers wp239, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.
    7. Howard Gospel & Andrew Pendleton, 2003. "Finance, Corporate Governance and the Management of Labour: A Conceptual and Comparative Analysis," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 41(3), pages 557-582, September.
    8. Frank Wilkinson, 2002. "Productive Systems and the Structuring Role of Economic and Social Theories," Working Papers wp225, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.
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    Cited by:

    1. Olabode Adeleke Oyewunmi & Omotayo Adewale Osibanjo & Hezekiah Oluwabusayo Falola & Olusola Joshua Olujobi, 2017. "Optimization by Integration: A Corporate Governance and Human Resource Management Dimension," International Review of Management and Marketing, Econjournals, vol. 7(1), pages 265-272.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    corporate governance; human resource management; stakeholding; employment; relations and Work and Employment Relations Survey;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J53 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor-Management Relations, Trade Unions, and Collective Bargaining - - - Labor-Management Relations; Industrial Jurisprudence
    • L21 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Business Objectives of the Firm
    • L23 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Organization of Production
    • M12 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - Personnel Management; Executives; Executive Compensation
    • M5 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics

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