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Macroprudential Policy and Elections: What Matters? Abstract:

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  • Can Sever
  • Emekcan Yucel

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  • Can Sever & Emekcan Yucel, 2020. "Macroprudential Policy and Elections: What Matters? Abstract:," Working Papers 2020/01, Bogazici University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:bou:wpaper:2020/01
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