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International financial transmission: emerging and mature markets

Author

Listed:
  • Felices, Guillermo

    () (Citigroup)

  • Grisse, Christian

    () (Federal Reserve Bank of New York)

  • Yang, Jing

    () (Bank of England)

Abstract

With an increasingly integrated global financial system, we frequently observe that shocks to individual asset markets affect financial markets worldwide. The aim of this paper is to quantify the comovements between bond markets in the US and emerging market economies using daily data from prior to the East Asian crisis through to the early stages of the current global financial crisis. We exploit the changing volatility of the data to fully identify a structural VAR, without imposing ad hoc restrictions. We find that shocks that widen emerging market sovereign debt (EMBIG) spreads have a negative effect on US interest rates in the short run (consistent with 'flight to quality' effects), while shocks that increase US interest rates raise EMBIG spreads over longer horizons (consistent with 'financing cost' or 'search for yield' effects). We also find that shocks that increase EMBIG spreads tend to widen US high-yield spreads and vice versa, constituting an important contagion channel through which crises in emerging market economies can affect mature markets. Forecast error variance decompositions show that shocks to US long rates can explain around 60%-70% of the variation of EMBIG and US high-yield spreads.

Suggested Citation

  • Felices, Guillermo & Grisse, Christian & Yang, Jing, 2009. "International financial transmission: emerging and mature markets," Bank of England working papers 373, Bank of England.
  • Handle: RePEc:boe:boeewp:0373
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Julio Escolano & Christina Kolerus & Constant A Lonkeng Ngouana, 2014. "Global Monetary Tightening; Emerging Markets Debt Dynamics and Fiscal Crises," IMF Working Papers 14/215, International Monetary Fund.
    2. Guglielmo Maria Caporale & Nicola Spagnolo, 2011. "Stock Market Integration between Three CEECs, Russia, and the UK," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(1), pages 158-169, February.
    3. Chang Shu & Dong He & Jinyue Dong & Honglin Wang, 2016. "Regional pull vs global push factors: China and US influence on Asia-Pacific financial markets," BIS Working Papers 579, Bank for International Settlements.
    4. Muhammad Naveed Tahir, 2012. "Relative Importance of Monetary Transmission Channels in Inflation Targeting Emerging Economies," EcoMod2012 4092, EcoMod.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • F30 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - General
    • G15 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - International Financial Markets

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