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Migration and human capital in an endogenous fertility model

Author

Listed:
  • Marchiori, Luca

    (Center for Mathematical Economics, Bielefeld University)

  • Pieretti, Patrice

    (Center for Mathematical Economics, Bielefeld University)

  • Zou, Benteng

    (Center for Mathematical Economics, Bielefeld University)

Abstract

How do high and low skilled migration affect fertility and human capital in migrants' origin countries? This question is analyzed within an overlapping generations model where parents choose the number of high and low skilled children they would like to have. Individuals migrate with a certain probability and remit to their parents. It is shown that a brain drain induces parents to have more high and less low educated children. Under certain conditions fertility may either rise or decline due to a brain drain. Low skilled emigration leads to reversed results, while the overall impact on human capital of either type of migration remains ambiguous. Subsequently, the model is calibrated on a developing economy. It is found that increased high skilled emigration reduces fertility and fosters human capital accumulation, while low skilled emigration induces higher population growth and a lower level of education.

Suggested Citation

  • Marchiori, Luca & Pieretti, Patrice & Zou, Benteng, 2011. "Migration and human capital in an endogenous fertility model," Center for Mathematical Economics Working Papers 409, Center for Mathematical Economics, Bielefeld University.
  • Handle: RePEc:bie:wpaper:409
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Bertoli, Simone & Marchetta, Francesca, 2015. "Bringing It All Back Home – Return Migration and Fertility Choices," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 27-40.
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    3. Yumna Hasan & Waqar Wadho, 2020. "Unskilled Migration, Child labor and Human Capital Accumulation of Children in the Presence of Parental Absenteeism," Lahore Journal of Economics, Department of Economics, The Lahore School of Economics, vol. 25(2), pages 119-138, July-Dec.
    4. Şule Akkoyunlu, 2013. "Migration-Induced Women’s Empowerment: The Case of Turkey," RSCAS Working Papers 2013/77, European University Institute.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Fertility; Migration; Human capital;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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