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Migration and human capital in an endogenous fertility model

Author

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  • Luca Marchiori
  • Patrice Pieretti
  • Benteng Zou

    (CREA, University of Luxembourg)

Abstract

What is the impact of high-skilled emigration on fertility and human capital in migrants’ origin countries? This question is analyzed within an overlapping generations model where parents choose to finance higher education to a certain number of their children. It follows that families are composed of high- and low-skilled children who may both emigrate with a certain probability when they reach adulthood. It is found that a brain drain leads to a change in children’s skill composition, with parents choosing to provide higher education to a larger number of their children. A calibration of the model suggests that, following a brain drain, the additional children benefiting from higher education might in the long run compensate for the loss of high-educated workers and lead to a brain gain.

Suggested Citation

  • Luca Marchiori & Patrice Pieretti & Benteng Zou, 2009. "Migration and human capital in an endogenous fertility model," DEM Discussion Paper Series 09-04, Department of Economics at the University of Luxembourg.
  • Handle: RePEc:luc:wpaper:09-04
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Bertoli, Simone & Marchetta, Francesca, 2015. "Bringing It All Back Home – Return Migration and Fertility Choices," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 27-40.
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    3. Şule Akkoyunlu, 2013. "Migration-Induced Women’s Empowerment: The Case of Turkey," RSCAS Working Papers 2013/77, European University Institute.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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