IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/spr/jopoec/v19y2006i4p725-748.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

International migration and economic growth: a source country perspective

Author

Listed:
  • Hung-Ju Chen

    ()

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Hung-Ju Chen, 2006. "International migration and economic growth: a source country perspective," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 19(4), pages 725-748, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:19:y:2006:i:4:p:725-748
    DOI: 10.1007/s00148-005-0023-1
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s00148-005-0023-1
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Gary S. Becker & Kevin M. Murphy & Robert Tamura, 1994. "Human Capital, Fertility, and Economic Growth," NBER Chapters,in: Human Capital: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis with Special Reference to Education (3rd Edition), pages 323-350 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. de la Croix, David & Doepke, Matthias, 2004. "Public versus private education when differential fertility matters," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(2), pages 607-629, April.
    3. Bhagwati, Jagdish & Rodriguez, Carlos, 1975. "Welfare-theoretical analyses of the brain drain," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 2(3), pages 195-221, September.
    4. Stark, Oded & Wang, Yong, 2002. "Inducing human capital formation: migration as a substitute for subsidies," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 86(1), pages 29-46, October.
    5. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Lucas Marchiori & Patrice Pieretti & Benteng Zou, 2010. "Migration and Human Capital in an Endogenous Fertility Model," Annals of Economics and Statistics, GENES, issue 97-98, pages 187-205.
    2. Michel Beine & Frédéric Docquier & Maurice Schiff, 2013. "International migration, transfer of norms and home country fertility," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 46(4), pages 1406-1430, November.
    3. Diana Loubaki, 2012. "On The Mechanics Of The Brain-Drain Reduction In Poorest Developing Countries," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 37(3), pages 75-106, September.
    4. Driouchi, Ahmed, 2009. "Failure of Participation & “Missing Women” in South Mediterranean Economies," MPRA Paper 21541, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 22 Mar 2010.
    5. Driouchi, Ahmed & Zouag, Nada, 2010. "Internal Mobility and Likelihood of Skill Losses in Localities of Emigration: Theory and Preliminary Empirical Application to Some Developing Economies," MPRA Paper 21799, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 01 Apr 2010.
    6. Bertoli, Simone & Marchetta, Francesca, 2015. "Bringing It All Back Home – Return Migration and Fertility Choices," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 27-40.
    7. Bonin, Holger & Eichhorst, Werner & Florman, Christer & Hansen, Mette Okkels & Skiöld, Lena & Stuhler, Jan & Tatsiramos, Konstantinos & Thomasen, Henrik & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2008. "Report No. 19: Geographic Mobility in the European Union: Optimising its Economic and Social Benefits," IZA Research Reports 19, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Frédéric Docquier & Hillel Rapoport, 2012. "Globalization, Brain Drain, and Development," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 50(3), pages 681-730, September.
    9. Theodore Palivos, 2009. "Welfare effects of illegal immigration," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 22(1), pages 131-144, January.
    10. Luca Marchiori & Patrice Pieretti & Benteng Zo, 2008. "Brain Drain, Remittances, and Fertility," Economie Internationale, CEPII research center, issue 115, pages 9-42.
    11. Djajić, Slobodan, 2013. "Barriers to immigration and the dynamics of emigration," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 41-52.
    12. repec:spr:jopoec:v:31:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s00148-017-0653-0 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Leonid V. Azarnert, 2017. "Migration, Congestion and Growth," CESifo Working Paper Series 6508, CESifo Group Munich.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Migration; Brain drain; Economic growth; F22; J24; O15;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:19:y:2006:i:4:p:725-748. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.