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Educational Systems, Growth and Income Distribution: A Quantitative Study

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  • Hung-ju Chen

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  • Hung-ju Chen, 2003. "Educational Systems, Growth and Income Distribution: A Quantitative Study," Computing in Economics and Finance 2003 13, Society for Computational Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:sce:scecf3:13
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    1. Pedro Carneiro & James J. Heckman, 2002. "The Evidence on Credit Constraints in Post--secondary Schooling," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(482), pages 705-734, October.
    2. Laitner, John & Ohlsson, Henry, 2001. "Bequest motives: a comparison of Sweden and the United States," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(1), pages 205-236, January.
    3. Card, David & Krueger, Alan B, 1992. "Does School Quality Matter? Returns to Education and the Characteristics of Public Schools in the United States," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(1), pages 1-40, February.
    4. Arleen Leibowitz, 1974. "Home Investments in Children," NBER Chapters,in: Economics of the Family: Marriage, Children, and Human Capital, pages 432-456 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Deininger, Klaus & Squire, Lyn, 1996. "A New Data Set Measuring Income Inequality," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 10(3), pages 565-591, September.
    6. Demetriades, Panicos O. & Hussein, Khaled A., 1996. "Does financial development cause economic growth? Time-series evidence from 16 countries," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(2), pages 387-411, December.
    7. Raquel Fernandez & Richard Rogerson, 1997. "Education finance reform: A dynamic perspective," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(1), pages 67-84.
    8. Oded Galor & Joseph Zeira, 1993. "Income Distribution and Macroeconomics," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 60(1), pages 35-52.
    9. Timothy J. Kehoe & David K. Levine, 1993. "Debt-Constrained Asset Markets," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 60(4), pages 865-888.
    10. Luintel, Kul B. & Khan, Mosahid, 1999. "A quantitative reassessment of the finance-growth nexus: evidence from a multivariate VAR," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(2), pages 381-405, December.
    11. Buly A. Cardak, 2004. "Education Choice, Endogenous Growth and Income Distribution," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 71, pages 57-81, February.
    12. Glomm, Gerhard, 1997. "Parental choice of human capital investment," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(1), pages 99-114, June.
    13. Deininger, Klaus & Squire, Lyn, 1996. "A New Data Set Measuring Income Inequality," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 10(3), pages 565-591, September.
    14. David de la Croix & Matthias Doepke, 2003. "Inequality and Growth: Why Differential Fertility Matters," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(4), pages 1091-1113, September.
    15. Tullio Jappelli & Marco Pagano, 1994. "Saving, Growth, and Liquidity Constraints," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 109(1), pages 83-109.
    16. Greenwood, Jeremy & Jovanovic, Boyan, 1990. "Financial Development, Growth, and the Distribution of Income," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(5), pages 1076-1107, October.
    17. Kaganovich, Michael & Zilcha, Itzhak, 1999. "Education, social security, and growth," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(2), pages 289-309, February.
    18. Glomm, Gerhard & Ravikumar, B, 1992. "Public versus Private Investment in Human Capital Endogenous Growth and Income Inequality," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(4), pages 818-834, August.
    19. Glomm, G. & Kaganovich, M., 1999. "Income Distribution Effects of Public Education and Social Security in a Growing Economy," Papers 9901, Michigan State - Econometrics and Economic Theory.
    20. Epple, Dennis & Romano, Richard E, 1998. "Competition between Private and Public Schools, Vouchers, and Peer-Group Effects," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(1), pages 33-62, March.
    21. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
    22. Roberto Perotti, 1993. "Political Equilibrium, Income Distribution, and Growth," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 60(4), pages 755-776.
    23. Eckstein, Zvi & Zilcha, Itzhak, 1994. "The effects of compulsory schooling on growth, income distribution and welfare," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(3), pages 339-359, July.
    24. Zhang, Jie, 1996. " Optimal Public Investments in Education and Endogenous Growth," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 98(3), pages 387-404.
    25. Arleen Leibowitz, 1974. "Home Investments in Children," NBER Chapters,in: Marriage, Family, Human Capital, and Fertility, pages 111-135 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    26. Leibowitz, Arleen, 1974. "Home Investments in Children," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(2), pages 111-131, Part II, .
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Elena Del Rey & Bertrand Verheyden, 2008. "Loans, Insurance and Failures in the Credit Market for Students," Working Papers 359, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    2. Chen, Hung-Ju, 2015. "Intellectual property rights and skills accumulation: A product-cycle model of FDI and outsourcing," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 328-343.
    3. Chen, Hung-Ju & Fang, I-Hsiang, 2013. "Migration, social security, and economic growth," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 386-399.
    4. Juan M. Sánchez, 2003. "Universitary Financing and Welfare: A Dynamic Analysis with Heterogeneous Agents and Overlapping Generations," Department of Economics, Working Papers 047, Departamento de Economía, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
    5. Chen, Hung-Ju, 2015. "Child allowances, educational subsidies and occupational choice," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 327-342.
    6. Nihal BAYRAKTAR & Emmanuel PINTO MOREIRA, "undated". "The Composition of Public Expenditure and Growth: A Small-scale Intertemporal Model for Low-Income Countries," EcoMod2008 23800009, EcoMod.
    7. Hung-Ju Chen, 2015. "Innovation and Intellectual Property Rights in a Product-cycle Model of Skills Accumulation," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 23(2), pages 320-344, May.
    8. Chen, Hung-Ju, 2013. "Intellectual Property Rights and Skills Accumulation: A North-South Model of FDI and Outsourcing," MPRA Paper 45035, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Agénor, Pierre-Richard & Neanidis, Kyriakos C., 2015. "Innovation, public capital, and growth," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 252-275.
    10. Wei-Bin Zhang, 2016. "Impact of Education Subsidies and Taxation on Wealth and Human Capital Accumulation," Eastern European Business and Economics Journal, Eastern European Business and Economics Studies Centre, vol. 2(3), pages 222-247.
    11. Chen, Hung-Ju, 2015. "Innovation and imitation: effects of intellectual property rights in a product-cycle model of skills accumulation," MPRA Paper 65745, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Apr 2015.
    12. Tournemaine, Frederic & Tsoukis, Christopher, 2015. "The growth–distribution nexus in a mixed regime of education with a status motive: On the macroeconomics of the welfare state," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 235-243.
    13. Pierre‐Richard Agénor, 2011. "Schooling and Public Capital in a Model of Endogenous Growth," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 78(309), pages 108-132, January.
    14. P R Agénor & K C Neanidis, 2006. "Corruption Clubs: The Allocation of Public Expenditure and Economic Growth," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 69, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
    15. Chen, Hung-Ju, 2013. "Child Allowances, Educational Subsidies and Economic Growth," MPRA Paper 51279, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    16. King Yoong Lim & Pengfei Jia & Ali Raza, 2018. "Crime, Human Capital, and the Impact of Different Taxation," Working Papers 220851234, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    17. David Hincapié Vélez, 2013. "¿Está convergiendo el gasto gubernamental en las Universidades Públicas colombianas?," ENSAYOS DE ECONOMÍA 012250, UNIVERSIDAD NACIONAL DE COLOMBIA SEDE MEDELLIN.
    18. Wei-Bin Zhang, 2014. "Endogenous population with human and physical capital accumulation," International Review of Economics, Springer;Happiness Economics and Interpersonal Relations (HEIRS), vol. 61(3), pages 231-252, September.
    19. Kitaura, Koji, 2012. "Education, borrowing constraints and growth," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 116(3), pages 575-578.
    20. Bayraktar, Nihal & Moreira, Emmanuel Pinto, 2007. "The composition of public expenditure and growth : a small-scale intertemporal model for low-income countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4430, The World Bank.
    21. Frederic Tournemaine & Christopher Tsoukis, 2015. "Public Expenditures, Growth, and Distribution in a Mixed Regime of Education with a Status Motive," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 17(5), pages 673-701, October.
    22. Tahar Abdessalem, 2010. "Financing Higher Education in Tunisia," Working Papers 551, Economic Research Forum, revised 10 Jan 2010.
    23. Lodhi, Abdul Salam & Tsegai, Daniel W. & Gerber, Nicolas, 2011. "Determinants of participation in child’s education and alternative activities in Pakistan," Discussion Papers 119110, University of Bonn, Center for Development Research (ZEF).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Income Distribution; Imperfect Credit Markets; Mixed Educational System;

    JEL classification:

    • E17 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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