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Asymmetric shocks in a currency union: The role of central bank collateral policy


  • F. Koulischer


Currency unions limit the ability of the central bank to use interest rate policy to accommodate asymmetric shocks. I show that collateral policy can serve to dampen asymmetric shocks in a currency area when these shocks also affect the collateral held by banks and when collateral portfolios of banks differ systematically across countries. In my model banks from 2 countries use collateral to borrow from the money market or a central bank that targets a level of interest rate (or investment) in each economy. The distressed bank may enter a “collateral crunch” regime where it is constrained in its access to funding due to a moral hazard problem. The central bank faces an heterogeneous transmission of its interest rate: a unit change in rate has a smaller effect on the economy rate of the distressed country. The central bank therefore sets a high interest rate which is well transmitted in the booming economy and relaxes the haircut on the collateral owned by the distressed bank.

Suggested Citation

  • F. Koulischer, 2015. "Asymmetric shocks in a currency union: The role of central bank collateral policy," Working papers 554, Banque de France.
  • Handle: RePEc:bfr:banfra:554

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Jakob Korbinian Eberl, 2016. "The Collateral Framework of the Eurosystem and Its Fiscal Implications," ifo Beiträge zur Wirtschaftsforschung, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 69, April.
    2. N. Cassola & F. Koulischer, 2016. "The Collateral Channel of Open Market Operations," Working papers 593, Banque de France.

    More about this item


    Central banking; currency union; collateral policy; repo; monetary policy.;

    JEL classification:

    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G20 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - General

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