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Human Capital Externalities and Growth

  • Carolina Arteaga Cabrales

    ()

This paper proposes a methodology to estimate externalities in human capital as a response to the evidence of a worldwide divergent development. We estimate supply and demand for human capital in a five-year panel for 60 countries in the period 1980-2000, and found that there are positive externalities in human capital accumulation close to one, implying increasing returns to scale and increasing marginal returns in human capital which eliminates the channel that enables generating conditional convergence.

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Paper provided by Banco de la Republica de Colombia in its series Borradores de Economia with number 631.

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Handle: RePEc:bdr:borrec:631
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  1. Brad Sturgill, 2009. "Cross-country Variation in Factor Shares and its Implications for Development Accounting," Working Papers 09-07, Department of Economics, Appalachian State University.
  2. Christian Daude & Eduardo Fernández-Arias, 2010. "On the Role of Productivity and Factor Accumulation in Economic Development in Latin America and the Caribbean," OECD Development Centre Working Papers 290, OECD Publishing.
  3. Swan, Trevor W, 2002. "Economic Growth," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 78(243), pages 375-80, December.
  4. Hernando Zuleta, 2006. "Factor saving innovations and factor income shares," DOCUMENTOS DE TRABAJO 002706, UNIVERSIDAD DEL ROSARIO.
  5. Carlos Medina & Christian Manuel Posso, . "Colombian and South American Immigrants in the United States of America: Education Levels, Job Qualifications and the Decision to Go Back Home," Borradores de Economia 572, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.
  6. Ciccone, Antonio & Papaioannou, Elias, 2006. "Human capital, the structure of production, and growth," Working Paper Series 0623, European Central Bank.
  7. Daniel Mejía & Marc St-Pierre, . "Unequal Opportunities and Human Capital Formation," Borradores de Economia 415, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.
  8. Laura Alfaro & Sebnem Kalemli-Ozcan & Vadym Volosovych, 2005. "Why Doesn't Capital Flow from Rich to Poor Countries? An Empirical Investigation," NBER Working Papers 11901, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Michel Beine & Frederic Docquier & Hillel Rapoport, 2006. "Measuring International Skilled Migration: New Estimates Controlling for Age of Entry," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 0613, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  10. Daniel Cohen & Marcelo Soto, 2001. "Growth and Human Capital: Good Data, Good Results," OECD Development Centre Working Papers 179, OECD Publishing.
  11. Caselli, Francesco & Feyrer, James, 2005. "The Marginal Product of Capital," CEPR Discussion Papers 5203, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  12. Stark, Oded & Wang, Yong, 2004. "The Intergenerational Overlap and Human Capital Formation," Economics Series 152, Institute for Advanced Studies.
  13. Viaene, J.-M. & Zilcha, I., 2001. "Human Capital Formation, Income Inequality and Growth," Papers 2001-13, Tel Aviv.
  14. Blankenau, William F. & Simpson, Nicole B., 2004. "Public education expenditures and growth," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(2), pages 583-605, April.
  15. Lutz Hendricks, 2002. "How Important Is Human Capital for Development? Evidence from Immigrant Earnings," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(1), pages 198-219, March.
  16. Tjalling C. Koopmans, 1963. "On the Concept of Optimal Economic Growth," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 163, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
  17. Hernando Zuleta, 2007. "Why labor income shares seem to be constant?," DOCUMENTOS DE TRABAJO 003779, UNIVERSIDAD DEL ROSARIO.
  18. Hernando Zuleta, 2008. "An empirical note on factor shares," The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(3), pages 379-390.
  19. Douglas Gollin, 2001. "Getting Income Shares Right," Department of Economics Working Papers 2001-11, Department of Economics, Williams College.
  20. Richard B. Freeman & Remco Oostendorp, 2000. "Wages Around the World: Pay Across Occupations and Countries," NBER Working Papers 8058, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  21. Benhabib, Jess & Spiegel, Mark M., 1994. "The role of human capital in economic development evidence from aggregate cross-country data," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 143-173, October.
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