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Factor Saving Innovations and Factor Income Shares

Author

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  • Hernando Zuleta

    (Universidad del Rosario)

Abstract

We present an endogenous growth model where innovations are factor saving. Technologies can be changed paying a cost and technological change takes place only if the benefits are larger than the costs. Since the gains derived from factor saving innovations depend on factor abundance, biased innovations respond to changes in factors' supply. Therefore, as the economy becomes more capital abundant agents try to use capital more intensively. Consequently, (a) the elasticity of output with respect to reproducible factors depends on the capital abundance of the economy and (b) the income share of reproducible factors increases as the output grows. Another insight of the model is that in some economies the production function converges to an AK in the long run, while in others long-run growth is zero. (Copyright: Elsevier)

Suggested Citation

  • Hernando Zuleta, 2008. "Factor Saving Innovations and Factor Income Shares," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 11(4), pages 836-851, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:issued:07-177
    DOI: 10.1016/j.red.2008.02.002
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Endogenous growth; Capital using and labor saving innovations; Factor income shares;

    JEL classification:

    • D33 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Factor Income Distribution
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

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