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Factor-eliminating technical change

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  • Peretto, Pietro F.
  • Seater, John J.

Abstract

Perpetual growth requires offsetting diminishing returns to reproducible factors of production. In this article we present a theory of factor elimination. For simplicity and clarity, there is no augmentation of non-reproducible factors, thus excluding the standard engine of growth. By spending resources on R&D, agents learn to change the exponents of a Cobb–Douglas production function. We obtain the economy's balanced growth path and complete transition dynamics. The theory provides a mechanism for the transition from an initial technology incapable of supporting perpetual growth to one with constant returns to reproducible factors that supports it.

Suggested Citation

  • Peretto, Pietro F. & Seater, John J., 2013. "Factor-eliminating technical change," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(4), pages 459-473.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:moneco:v:60:y:2013:i:4:p:459-473
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jmoneco.2013.01.005
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    Cited by:

    1. Prettner, Klaus & Strulik, Holger, 2017. "The lost race against the machine: Automation, education and inequality in an R&D-based growth model," Hohenheim Discussion Papers in Business, Economics and Social Sciences 08-2017, University of Hohenheim, Faculty of Business, Economics and Social Sciences.
    2. Gersbach, Hans & Schneider, Maik T., 2015. "On the global supply of basic research," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 123-137.
    3. Hemous, David & Olsen, Morten, 2014. "The Rise of the Machines: Automation, Horizontal Innovation and Income Inequality," CEPR Discussion Papers 10244, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Hernando Zuleta, 2015. "Getting Growth Accounting Right," DOCUMENTOS CEDE 013814, UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS ANDES-CEDE.
    5. Seth G. Benzell & Laurence J. Kotlikoff & Guillermo LaGarda & Jeffrey D. Sachs, 2015. "Robots Are Us: Some Economics of Human Replacement," NBER Working Papers 20941, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Goren, Amir, 2016. "Inequality, Technical Change or Leverage?," MPRA Paper 72983, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Antonio Accetturo & Alberto Dalmazzo & Guido Blasio, 2014. "Skill Polarization In Local Labor Markets Under Share-Altering Technical Change," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(2), pages 249-272, March.
    8. Abeliansky, Ana & Prettner, Klaus, 2017. "Automation and demographic change," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 310, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    9. repec:eee:jmacro:v:52:y:2017:i:c:p:23-38 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Jakob Brochner Madsen, 2016. "Wealth And Inequality In Eight Centuries Of British Capitalism," Monash Economics Working Papers 20-16, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    11. Sturgill, Brad, 2014. "Back to the basics: Revisiting the development accounting methodology," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 52-68.
    12. Brad Sturgill, 2009. "Cross-country Variation in Factor Shares and its Implications for Development Accounting," Working Papers 09-07, Department of Economics, Appalachian State University.
    13. Hernando Zuleta, 2015. "Factor shares, inequality, and capital flows," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 82(2), pages 647-667, October.
    14. Growiec, Jakub & McAdam, Peter & Mućk, Jakub, 2018. "Endogenous labor share cycles: Theory and evidence," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 74-93.
    15. Prettner, Klaus, 2016. "The implications of automation for economic growth and the labor share," Hohenheim Discussion Papers in Business, Economics and Social Sciences 18-2016, University of Hohenheim, Faculty of Business, Economics and Social Sciences.
    16. Laura Liliana Moreno Herrera & Jorge Eduardo Pérez Pérez, 2009. "Biased Technological Change, Impatience and Welfare," DEGIT Conference Papers c014_046, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.
    17. Julián David Parada, 2008. "Tasa de depreciación endógena y crecimiento económico," DOCUMENTOS DE TRABAJO 004594, UNIVERSIDAD DEL ROSARIO.
    18. Nazrullaeva, Eugenia, 2010. "Modeling the relationship between investment processes and costs structure applied to Russian economic activities in 2005-2009," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 19(3), pages 38-61.
    19. Jakob Madsen & James Ang & Rajabrata Banerjee, 2010. "Four centuries of British economic growth: the roles of technology and population," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 15(4), pages 263-290, December.
    20. Alberto Dalmazzo & Antonio Accetturo & Guido de Blasio, 2011. "Skill-Biased Share-Altering Technical Change in Spatial General Equilibrium," ERSA conference papers ersa11p83, European Regional Science Association.
    21. Yuki, Kazuhiro, 2012. "Mechanization, task assignment, and inequality," MPRA Paper 37754, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General
    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

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