IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/bdr/borrec/1005.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

I know what you did during the last bubble: Determinants of housing bubbles' duration in OECD countries

Author

Listed:
  • J. Sebastian Amador-Torres

    () (Banco de la República de Colombia)

  • Jose Eduardo Gomez-Gonzalez

    () (Banco de la República de Colombia)

  • Sebastian Sanin-Restrepo

    () (Banco de la República de Colombia)

Abstract

We use hazard models to study the determinants of housing price bubbles’ duration. We answer two related questions: i). Does prolonged domestic monetary policy easing increase the duration of housing price bubbles? And, ii). Does prolonged monetary policy easing in the US influences housing bubbles’ duration in other OECD countries? Our results suggest that the answer to the first question is a clear yes, while the answer to the second question is an indirect yes. Other variables that are also good predictors of the duration of bubbles are GDP growth and the degree of financial market development. Bubbles in developed financial markets tend to last longer. Other institutional variables, such as loan-to-value caps and limits to banking leverage, population growth and the consumer confidence index, have no effect on the probability of ending a bubble. Our results have relevant policy implications.

Suggested Citation

  • J. Sebastian Amador-Torres & Jose Eduardo Gomez-Gonzalez & Sebastian Sanin-Restrepo, 2017. "I know what you did during the last bubble: Determinants of housing bubbles' duration in OECD countries," Borradores de Economia 1005, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.
  • Handle: RePEc:bdr:borrec:1005
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://repositorio.banrep.gov.co/bitstream/handle/20.500.12134/6318/be_1005.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Arouri, Mohamed & Jawadi, Fredj & Nguyen, Duc Khuong, 2013. "What can we tell about monetary policy synchronization and interdependence over the 2007–2009 global financial crisis?," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 175-187.
    2. Markus K. Brunnermeier & Isabel Schnabel, 2014. "Bubbles and Central Banks: Historical Perspectives," Working Papers 1411, Gutenberg School of Management and Economics, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, revised 31 Oct 2014.
    3. Ben S. Bernanke & Mark Gertler, 2001. "Should Central Banks Respond to Movements in Asset Prices?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(2), pages 253-257, May.
    4. Efthymios Pavlidis & Alisa Yusupova & Ivan Paya & David Peel & Enrique Martínez-García & Adrienne Mack & Valerie Grossman, 2016. "Episodes of Exuberance in Housing Markets: In Search of the Smoking Gun," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 53(4), pages 419-449, November.
    5. Christophe Blot & Paul Hubert & Fabien Labondance, 2017. "Does monetary policy generate asset price bubbles ?," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/2geqol5jud8, Sciences Po.
    6. Jose Eduardo Gomez-Gonzalez & Juliana Gamboa-Arbeláez & Jorge Hirs-Garzón & Andrés Pinchao-Rosero, 2018. "When Bubble Meets Bubble: Contagion in OECD Countries," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 56(4), pages 546-566, May.
    7. Juan Amador & José Gómez-González & Andrés Pabón, 2013. "Loan growth and bank risk: new evidence," Financial Markets and Portfolio Management, Springer;Swiss Society for Financial Market Research, vol. 27(4), pages 365-379, December.
    8. Peter C. B. Phillips & Jun Yu, 2011. "Dating the timeline of financial bubbles during the subprime crisis," Quantitative Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 2(3), pages 455-491, November.
    9. Stephen Cecchetti & Tommaso Mancini Griffoli & Machiko Narita, 2017. "Does Prolonged Monetary Policy Easing Increase Financial Vulnerability?," IMF Working Papers 17/65, International Monetary Fund.
    10. Altunbas, Yener & Gambacorta, Leonardo & Marques-Ibanez, David, 2012. "Do bank characteristics influence the effect of monetary policy on bank risk?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 117(1), pages 220-222.
    11. repec:ecb:ecbwps:20111427 is not listed on IDEAS
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Housing bubbles; Bubble formation; Recursive right-tailed unit root tests; Duration; Hazard function; OECD.;

    JEL classification:

    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • C22 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bdr:borrec:1005. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Clorith Angélica Bahos Olivera). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/brcgvco.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.