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The generation gap: relative earnings of young and old workers in Italy

Author

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  • Alfonso Rosolia

    () (Banca d�Italia)

  • Roberto Torrini

    () (Banca d�Italia)

Abstract

We describe the evolution of the relative earnings of young male workers and the evolution of the age-earnings profiles across cohorts in the last three decades. We draw on administrative records to document a significant deterioration of entry wages over the 1990s in the presence of basically stable experience profiles. We supplement the analysis with the Bank of Italy's Survey on Household Income and Wealth and show that the wage gap between younger and older workers widened in the 90s for all levels of educational attainment. These developments are not accounted for by changes in relative skill-age labor supplies or in other potential socio-demographic determinants of wages. We argue that they were probably the result of partial labor market reforms that generated a dual labor market along the age dimension, opening a gap between the earnings of old incumbent workers and those of new labor market entrants.

Suggested Citation

  • Alfonso Rosolia & Roberto Torrini, 2007. "The generation gap: relative earnings of young and old workers in Italy," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 639, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  • Handle: RePEc:bdi:wptemi:td_639_07
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Rebekka Christopoulou & Theodora Kosma, 2009. "Skills and Wage Inequality in Greece: Evidence from Matched Employer-Employee Data, 1995-2002," GreeSE – Hellenic Observatory Papers on Greece and Southeast Europe 26, Hellenic Observatory, LSE.
    2. Berloffa, Gabriella & Modena, Francesca, 2012. "Economic well-being in Italy: The role of income insecurity and intergenerational inequality," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 81(3), pages 751-765.
    3. Irene Iodice & Chiara Tomasi, 2015. "Skill upgrading, wage gap and international trade: firm-level evidence for Italian manufacturing firms," LEM Papers Series 2015/06, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
    4. Paolo Naticchioni & Michele Raitano & Claudia Vittori, 2016. "La Meglio Gioventù: earnings gaps across generations and skills in Italy," Economia Politica: Journal of Analytical and Institutional Economics, Springer;Fondazione Edison, vol. 33(2), pages 233-264, August.
    5. Dino Pinelli & Roberta Torre & Lucianajulia Pace & Laura Cassio & Alfonso Arpaia, 2017. "The Recent Reform of the Labour Market in Italy: A Review," European Economy - Discussion Papers 2015 - 072, Directorate General Economic and Financial Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission.
    6. Gabriella Berloffa & Francesca Modena & Paola Villa, 2014. "Changing Labour Market Opportunities for Young People in Italy and the Role of the Family of Origin," Rivista italiana degli economisti, Società editrice il Mulino, issue 2, pages 227-252.
    7. Bosio, Giulio & Leonardi, Marco, 2011. "The Impact of Bologna Process on the Graduate Labour Market: Demand and Supply," IZA Discussion Papers 5789, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Tealdi, Cristina, 2011. "Typical and atypical employment contracts: the case of Italy," MPRA Paper 39456, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Annamaria Simonazzi & Paolo Villa & Federico Lucidi, 2008. "Continuity and Change in the Italian Model: Italy's Laborious Convergence towards the European Social Model," Working Papers 108, University of Rome La Sapienza, Department of Public Economics.
    10. Giuseppe Croce, 2016. "La rincorsa mancata. Istruzione e cambiamento tecnologico in Italia a confronto con le altre economie avanzate," QUADERNI DI ECONOMIA DEL LAVORO, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2016(106), pages 77-99.
    11. Riccardo Leoni, 2011. "Employability of graduates and development of competencies: mind the gap and mind the step! Empirical evidence for Italy," Working Papers (-2012) 1101, University of Bergamo, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    entry wages; relative wages; cohort effects; labor market reforms;

    JEL classification:

    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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