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The cycle of earnings inequality: evidence from Spanish social security data

  • Stéphane Bonhomme

    (CEMFI)

  • Laura Hospido

    ()

    (Banco de España)

We use detailed information on labor earnings and employment from Social Security records to document earnings inequality in Spain from 1988 to 2010. Male earnings inequality was strongly countercyclical: it increased around the 1993 recession, showed a substantial decrease during the 1997-2007 expansion and then a sharp increase during the recent recession. These developments were partly driven by the cyclicality of employment and earnings in the lower-middle part of the distribution. We emphasize the importance of the housing boom and subsequent housing bust, and show that demand shocks in the construction sector significantly impacted aggregate labor market outcomes

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File URL: http://www.bde.es/f/webbde/SES/Secciones/Publicaciones/PublicacionesSeriadas/DocumentosTrabajo/12/Fich/dt1225e.pdf
File Function: First version, July 2012
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Paper provided by Banco de España & Working Papers Homepage in its series Working Papers with number 1225.

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Length: 70 pages
Date of creation: Jul 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:bde:wpaper:1225
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.bde.es/

Web page: http://www.bde.es/bde/en/secciones/informes/Publicaciones_se/docs/
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  1. Fatih Guvenen & Serdar Ozkan & Jae Song, 2013. "The nature of countercyclical income risk," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2013-25, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  2. Heathcote, Jonathan & Perri, Fabrizio & Violante, Giovanni L, 2009. "Unequal We Stand: An Empirical Analysis of Economic Inequality in the United States, 1967-2006," CEPR Discussion Papers 7538, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Pijoan-Mas, Josep & Sánchez-Marcos, Virginia, 2009. "Spain is Different: Falling Trends of Inequality," CEPR Discussion Papers 7489, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. David H. Autor & Lawrence F. Katz & Melissa S. Kearney, 2005. "Rising Wage Inequality: The Role of Composition and Prices," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 2096, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
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  6. Aparicio Fenoll, Ainhoa, 2010. "High-School Dropouts and Transitory Labor Market Shocks: The Case of the Spanish Housing Boom," IZA Discussion Papers 5139, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Richard Blundell & Amanda Gosling & Hidehiko Ichimura & Costas Meghir, 2004. "Changes in the distribution of male and female wages accounting for employment composition using bounds," IFS Working Papers W04/25, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  8. Gonzalez, Libertad & Ortega, Francesc, 2009. "Immigration and Housing Booms: Evidence from Spain," IZA Discussion Papers 4333, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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  10. Aitor Lacuesta & Sergio Puente & Ernesto Villanueva, 2011. "The schooling response to a sustained increase in low-skill wages: evidence from Spain 1989-2009," Working Papers 1208, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
  11. Maia Güell & Barbara Petrongolo, 2003. "How Binding are Legal Limits? Transitions from Termporary to Permanent Work in Spain," Working Papers 75, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
  12. Juan José Dolado & Carlos García-Serrano & Juan F. Jimeno, . "Drawing Lessons from the Boom of Temporary Jobs in Spain," Working Papers 2001-11, FEDEA.
  13. Gadi Barlevy & Daniel Tsiddon, 2004. "Earnings Inequality and the Business Cycle," NBER Working Papers 10469, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Dolado, Juan J. & Ortigueira, Salvador & Stucchi, Rodolfo, 2012. "Does dual employment protection affect TFP? Evidence from Spanish manufacturing firms," CEPR Discussion Papers 8763, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  15. Florentino Felgueroso & Manuel Hidalgo & SergiJiménez Martín, 2010. "Explaining the fall of the skill wage premium in Spain," Working Papers 2010-19, FEDEA.
  16. Manuel A. Hidalgo, 2008. "Wage Inequality in Spain, 1980-2000," Working Papers 08.08, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Department of Economics.
  17. Raquel Carrasco & Juan F. Jimeno & A. Carolina Ortega, 2011. "Accounting for changes in the Spanish wage distribution: the role of employment Composition effects," Working Papers 1120, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
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