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Why East Germany did not become a new Mezzogiorno

Author

Listed:
  • Andrea Boltho

    (Magdalen College, University of Oxford)

  • Wendy Carlin

    () (University College London and CEPR)

  • Pasquale Scaramozzino

    (SOAS, University of London and Università degli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata)

Abstract

In an earlier paper (Journal of Comparative Economics, 1997) the authors argued, against the conventional wisdom of the time, that East Germany was unlikely to follow a development path similar to that of the Italian Mezzogiorno. This paper revisits the issue some 25 years after German reunification. Statistical tests show that the absence of income per capita convergence between South and North that has characterized Italy since the war, continued over the last two or more decades. Germany, on the other hand, has, over the same period, seen significant income convergence between East and West. The main explanations that are provided for such contrasting outcomes stress differences between the two countries (and within the two countries) in investment performance, in labour market flexibility, and, in particular, in developments in the tradeable sector whose performance in East Germany has been much superior to that of the Mezzogiorno. These differences, in turn, are linked to very different standards of institutional quality and governance which are almost certainly rooted in the two “poor” regions’ longer-run history.

Suggested Citation

  • Andrea Boltho & Wendy Carlin & Pasquale Scaramozzino, 2016. "Why East Germany did not become a new Mezzogiorno," a/ Working Papers Series 1603, Italian Association for the Study of Economic Asymmetries, Rome (Italy).
  • Handle: RePEc:ais:wpaper:1603
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Angelica Sbardella & Emanuele Pugliese & Andrea Zaccaria & Pasquale Scaramozzino, 2018. "The role of complex analysis in modeling economic growth," Papers 1808.10428, arXiv.org.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    East Germany; Mezzogiorno; Investment performance; Labour market; Flexibility; Social capital; Competitiveness; Economic complexity.;

    JEL classification:

    • N10 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - General, International, or Comparative
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O57 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Comparative Studies of Countries
    • P52 - Economic Systems - - Comparative Economic Systems - - - Comparative Studies of Particular Economies
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes

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