IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ags/uerser/34071.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Moving Toward the Food Guide Pyramid: Implications for U.S. Agriculture

Author

Listed:
  • Young, C. Edwin
  • Kantor, Linda Scott

Abstract

Recent studies show that average diets differ considerably from Food Guide Pyramid recommendations. The gap between current consumption and recommendations is particularly large for caloric sweeteners, fats and oils, fruits, and certain vegetables, notably dark-green leafy and deep-yellow vegetables, and dry beans, peas, and lentils. The change in food consumption needed to meet Food Guide Pyramid serving recommendations will result in adjustments in U.S. agricultural production, trade, nonfood uses, and prices. The net adjustment in crop acreage is projected to be relatively small, about 2 percent of total cropland in 1991-95. However, this small net adjustment masks larger anticipated changes for some sectors, particularly sweeteners, fats and oils, and citrus fruits.

Suggested Citation

  • Young, C. Edwin & Kantor, Linda Scott, 1999. "Moving Toward the Food Guide Pyramid: Implications for U.S. Agriculture," Agricultural Economics Reports 34071, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:uerser:34071
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/34071
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kantor, Linda Scott, 1996. "Many Americans are not Meeting Food Guide Pyramid Dietary Recommendations," Food Review: The Magazine of Food Economics, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, vol. 19(1).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Ellen Desjardins & Rod MacRae & Theresa Schumilas, 2010. "Linking future population food requirements for health with local production in Waterloo Region, Canada," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 27(2), pages 129-140, June.
    2. Rickard, Bradley J. & Gonsalves, Jana, 2006. "Examining Potential Changes in Nutrition: Recommendations and Implications for Specialty Crops in California," Research Project Reports 121617, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, California Institute for the Study of Specialty Crops.
    3. Alston, Julian M. & Mullally, Conner C. & Sumner, Daniel A. & Townsend, Marilyn & Vosti, Stephen A., 2009. "Likely effects on obesity from proposed changes to the US food stamp program," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 176-184, April.
    4. Nordström, Jonas & Thunström, Linda, 2009. "The impact of tax reforms designed to encourage healthier grain consumption," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 622-634, May.
    5. Peters, Christian & Bills, Nelson L. & Wilkins, Jennifer & Smith, R. David, 2002. "Vegetable Consumption, Dietary Guidelines and Agricultural Production in New York State—Implications for Local Food Economies," Research Bulletins 122636, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.
    6. Rickard, Bradley J. & Gonsalves, Jana L., 2008. "How would compliance with dietary recommendations affect revenues for agricultural producers?," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(5), pages 422-433, October.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:uerser:34071. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/ersgvus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.