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Georgia Farmers’ Perceptions of Production Barrier in Organic Vegetable and Fruit Agriculture

Author

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  • Nelson, Mack C.
  • Styles, Erika K.
  • Pattanaik, Nalini
  • Liu, Xuanli
  • Brown, James

Abstract

Profit maximizing farm producers attempt to minimize risk in their business by utilizing available cost effective methods and information. This research attempts to identify production barriers to vegetable and fruit producers adopting organic methods of production and determine which of these barriers to organic production influence adoption most. The data for this study is from a 2014 state wide telephone survey of Georgia’s vegetable and fruit producers. Producers were segregated into five groups; those using 100 percent conventional methods, more conventional than organic, those using about 50 percent organic and 50 percent conventional, more organic than conventional, and 100 percent organic method. Results are based on logit analysis of producers’ perceptions of barriers, farm and socioeconomic characteristics. A number of factors including producers’ evaluation of production barriers are shown to influence adoption of organic production methods. Among perception factors and characteristics influencing adoption are organic certification costs, reluctance to adopt new production methods, lower organic yields, liability of organic producers is higher, labor costs, producer age, educational attainment, years of organic farming experience and farm size (measured as gross annual farm sales).

Suggested Citation

  • Nelson, Mack C. & Styles, Erika K. & Pattanaik, Nalini & Liu, Xuanli & Brown, James, 2015. "Georgia Farmers’ Perceptions of Production Barrier in Organic Vegetable and Fruit Agriculture," 2015 Annual Meeting, January 31-February 3, 2015, Atlanta, Georgia 196868, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:saea15:196868
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.196868
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/196868/files/Final%20SAEA-Organic%20Production-%20Barrier%20Paper.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. James A. Langley & Earl O. Heady & Kent D. Olson, 1982. "Macro Implications of a Complete Transformation of U.S. Agricultural Production to Organic Farming Practices," Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) Publications (archive only) 82-wp9, Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University.
    2. Martinez, Lourdes R. & Bingen, R. James & Conner, David S., 2009. "Handlers Perspectives on Sourcing Organic Produce From the Great Lakes Region," Choices: The Magazine of Food, Farm, and Resource Issues, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 24(3), pages 1-6.
    3. Kiesel Kristin & Villas-Boas Sofia B, 2007. "Got Organic Milk? Consumer Valuations of Milk Labels after the Implementation of the USDA Organic Seal," Journal of Agricultural & Food Industrial Organization, De Gruyter, vol. 5(1), pages 1-40, April.
    4. Cook, Roberta L., 2011. "Fundamental Forces Affecting U.S. Fresh Produce Growers And Marketers," Choices: The Magazine of Food, Farm, and Resource Issues, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 26(4), pages 1-13.
    5. Smith, Travis A. & Huang, Chung L. & Lin, Biing-Hwan, 2009. "Does Price or Income Affect Organic Choice? Analysis of U.S. Fresh Produce Users," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 41(3), pages 731-744, December.
    6. Chan, Stephanie & Caldwell, Brian & Rickard, Bradley J., 2010. "An Economic Examination of Alternative Organic Cropping Systems in New York State," EB Series 121652, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.
    7. Greene, Catherine R. & Slattery, Edward & McBride, William D., 2010. "America’s Organic Farmers Face Issues and Opportunities," Amber Waves:The Economics of Food, Farming, Natural Resources, and Rural America, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, pages 1-6.
    8. Stevens-Garmon, John & Huang, Chung L. & Lin, Biing-Hwan, 2007. "Organic Demand: A Profile of Consumers in the Fresh Produce Market," Choices: The Magazine of Food, Farm, and Resource Issues, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 22(2), pages 1-8.
    9. Volpe, Richard J., III, 2006. "Exploring the Potential Effects of Organic Production on Contracting in American Agribusiness," 2006 Annual meeting, July 23-26, Long Beach, CA 21086, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    10. Klonsky, Karen & Greene, Catherine R., 2005. "Widespread Adoption of Organic Agriculture in the US: Are Market-Driven Policies Enough?," 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI 19382, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    11. Kiesel Kristin & Villas-Boas Sofia B, 2007. "Got Organic Milk? Consumer Valuations of Milk Labels after the Implementation of the USDA Organic Seal," Journal of Agricultural & Food Industrial Organization, De Gruyter, vol. 5(1), pages 1-40, April.
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    Keywords

    Crop Production/Industries; Marketing;

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