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Exploring the Potential Effects of Organic Production on Contracting in American Agribusiness

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  • Volpe, Richard J., III

Abstract

Organic production, while still a niche market in U.S. agriculture, is growing at a rapid rate. This paper argues that organic producers, particularly those seeking certification to sell at the retail level, share many characteristics with conventional producers who opt for contracting over independence. These include yield risk, search and transaction costs, and technological changes. Depending on the rate at which federal assistance programs grow and evolve to serve organic producers, contracting may become a popular choice within the organic sector. In turn, contracting may come to cover a significantly larger share of agricultural production as the organic sector continues to grow.

Suggested Citation

  • Volpe, Richard J., III, 2006. "Exploring the Potential Effects of Organic Production on Contracting in American Agribusiness," 2006 Annual meeting, July 23-26, Long Beach, CA 21086, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea06:21086
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/21086
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Van der Sluis, Evert & Diersen, Matthew A. & Dobbs, Thomas L., 2002. "Agricultural Biotechnology: Farm-Level, Market, And Policy Considerations," Journal of Agribusiness, Agricultural Economics Association of Georgia, vol. 20(1).
    2. Timothy A. Park & Luanne Lohr, 1996. "Supply and Demand Factors for Organic Produce," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(3), pages 647-655.
    3. Key, Nigel D., 2004. "Agricultural Contracting and the Scale of Production," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 33(2), October.
    4. Gary D. Thompson & Julia Kidwell, 1998. "Explaining the Choice of Organic Produce: Cosmetic Defects, Prices, and Consumer Preferences," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 80(2), pages 277-287.
    5. Luanne Lohr, 1998. "Implications of Organic Certification for Market Structure and Trade," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 80(5), pages 1125-1129.
    6. Dimitri, Carolyn & Greene, Catherine R., 2002. "Recent Growth Patterns In The U.S. Organic Foods Market," Agricultural Information Bulletins 33715, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    7. Roberts Michael J & Key Nigel, 2005. "Losing Under Contract: Transaction-Cost Externalities and Spot Market Disintegration," Journal of Agricultural & Food Industrial Organization, De Gruyter, vol. 3(2), pages 1-19, April.
    8. Martin, Laura L., 1997. "Production Contracts, Risk Shifting, and Relative Performance Payments in the Pork Industry," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 29(02), pages 267-278, December.
    9. Greene, Catherine R. & Kremen, Amy, 2003. "U.S. Organic Farming In 2000-2001: Adoption Of Certified Systems," Agricultural Information Bulletins 33769, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    10. Karen Klonsky & Laura Tourte, 1998. "Organic Agricultural Production in the United States: Debates and Directions," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 80(5), pages 1119-1124.
    11. Martin, Laura L., 1997. "Production Contracts, Risk Shifting, And Relative Performance Payments In The Pork Industry," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 29(02), December.
    12. Nigel Key, 2005. "How much do farmers value their independence?," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 33(1), pages 117-126, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Nelson, Mack C. & Styles, Erika K. & Pattanaik, Nalini & Liu, Xuanli & Brown, James, 2015. "Georgia Farmers’ Perceptions of Production Barrier in Organic Vegetable and Fruit Agriculture," 2015 Annual Meeting, January 31-February 3, 2015, Atlanta, Georgia 196868, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.

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    Keywords

    Agribusiness;

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