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Nutrition transition in two emerging countries: A comparison between China and Russia

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  • Burggraf, Christine
  • Kuhn, Lena
  • Zhao, Quiran
  • Teuber, Ramona
  • Glauben, Thomas

Abstract

This study provides empirical evidence on the link between economic growth, nutrition, and health in two emerging economies, China and Russia. Both countries have experienced rising average incomes, accompanied by an increasing rate of nutrition-related chronic diseases in recent years. Thereby, the higher growth rate of the occurrence of obesity in China suggests a certain catching-up effect and tremendously increasing problems with chronic diseases in the longer run, especially in urban areas of China. Further, our results indicate that with increasing household incomes over time the demand for carbohydrates decreases, while the demand for meat and dairy products, as well as fruits increases. This is a development generally known as nutrition transition. Finally, our estimation results of a Quadratic Almost Ideal Demand System (QUAIDS) underscore the finding that income growth in China and Russia tends to increase the demand for animal-based products much stronger than the demand for carbohydrates.

Suggested Citation

  • Burggraf, Christine & Kuhn, Lena & Zhao, Quiran & Teuber, Ramona & Glauben, Thomas, 2015. "Nutrition transition in two emerging countries: A comparison between China and Russia," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 211375, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae15:211375
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.211375
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/211375/files/Burggraf-Nutrition%20transition%20in%20two%20emerging%20countries-849.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety; International Development;

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