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Economic growth and nutrition transition: an empirical study comparing demand elasticities for foods in China and Russia

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  • Burggraf, Christine
  • Kuhn, Lena
  • Zhao, Qiran
  • Glauben, Thomas
  • Teuber, Ramona

Abstract

Considering emerging economies like China and Russia, we analyze whether income growth as a major driver of nutrition transition has a significant effect on the consumption of different food aggregates and how these effects differ between both countries. Therefore, we estimate expenditure elasticities of Chinese and Russian consumers for six different food aggregates. Our results indicate that future income growth in China and Russia will continue to increase meat and fat consumption. Although being a positive signal for problems of malnutrition in China that trend tends to further increase the incidence of nutrition-related chronic diseases in both countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Burggraf, Christine & Kuhn, Lena & Zhao, Qiran & Glauben, Thomas & Teuber, Ramona, 2014. "Economic growth and nutrition transition: an empirical study comparing demand elasticities for foods in China and Russia," 2014 International Congress, August 26-29, 2014, Ljubljana, Slovenia 182828, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:eaae14:182828
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.182828
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Chatalova, Lioudmila & Müller, Daniel & Valentinov, Vladislav & Balmann, Alfons, 2016. "The rise of the food risk society and the changing nature of the technological treadmill," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 1-10.
    2. Krivonos, Ekaterina & Kuhn, Lena, 2019. "Trade and dietary diversity in Eastern Europe and Central Asia," IAMO Discussion Papers 182, Leibniz Institute of Agricultural Development in Transition Economies (IAMO).

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    Keywords

    Demand and Price Analysis;

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