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How do obese people afford to be obese? Consumption strategies of Russian households

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  • Staudigel, Matthias

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  • Staudigel, Matthias, 2011. "How do obese people afford to be obese? Consumption strategies of Russian households," 2011 International Congress, August 30-September 2, 2011, Zurich, Switzerland 116065, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:eaae11:116065
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    1. Xiaohua Yu & David Abler, 2009. "The Demand for Food Quality in Rural China," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 91(1), pages 57-69.
    2. Powell, Lisa M. & Bao, Yanjun, 2009. "Food prices, access to food outlets and child weight," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 7(1), pages 64-72, March.
    3. Behrman, Jere R & Deolalikar, Anil B, 1987. "Will Developing Country Nutrition Improve with Income? A Case Study for Rural South India," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 95(3), pages 492-507, June.
    4. Corinna Manig & Alessio Moneta, 2014. "More or better? Measuring quality versus quantity in food consumption," Journal of Bioeconomics, Springer, vol. 16(2), pages 155-178, July.
    5. David M. Cutler & Edward L. Glaeser & Jesse M. Shapiro, 2003. "Why Have Americans Become More Obese?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 17(3), pages 93-118, Summer.
    6. Powell, Lisa M., 2009. "Fast food costs and adolescent body mass index: Evidence from panel data," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(5), pages 963-970, September.
    7. Steven Stillman & Duncan Thomas, 2008. "Nutritional Status During an Economic Crisis: Evidence from Russia," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(531), pages 1385-1417, August.
    8. Mroz, Thomas A & Popkin, Barry M, 1995. "Poverty and the Economic Transition in the Russian Federation," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 44(1), pages 1-31, October.
    9. Fred Kuchler & Abebayehu Tegene & J. Michael Harris, 2005. "Taxing Snack Foods: Manipulating Diet Quality or Financing Information Programs?," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 27(1), pages 4-20.
    10. Smed, Sinne & Jensen, Jorgen D. & Denver, Sigrid, 2007. "Socio-economic characteristics and the effect of taxation as a health policy instrument," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(5-6), pages 624-639.
    11. Ulijaszek, Stanley J. & Koziel, Slawomir, 2007. "Nutrition transition and dietary energy availability in Eastern Europe after the collapse of communism," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 5(3), pages 359-369, December.
    12. Cash, Sean B. & Sunding, David L. & Zilberman, David, 2004. "Fat Taxes And Thin Subsidies: Prices, Diet, And Health Outcomes," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 19961, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    13. Geir Wæhler Gustavsen & Kyrre Rickertsen, 2009. "The effects of taxes on purchases of sugar-sweetened carbonated soft drinks: a quantile regression approach," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(6), pages 707-716.
    14. Cash, Sean B. & Lacanilao, Ryan D., 2007. "Taxing Food to Improve Health: Economic Evidence and Arguments," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 36(02), pages 174-182, October.
    15. Beatty, Timothy K.M., 2007. "The Scope of the Unit Value Problem," Consumer and Market Demand Network Papers 6833, University of Alberta, Department of Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology.
    16. Olivier Allais & Patrice Bertail & Véronique Nichèle, 2010. "The Effects of a Fat Tax on French Households' Purchases: A Nutritional Approach," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 92(1), pages 228-245.
    17. Chouinard Hayley H & Davis David E & LaFrance Jeffrey T & Perloff Jeffrey M, 2007. "Fat Taxes: Big Money for Small Change," Forum for Health Economics & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 10(2), pages 1-30, June.
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    1. repec:zbw:iamost:86 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Burggraf, Christine & Teuber, Ramona & Brosig, Stephan & Glauben, Thomas, 2015. "Economic growth and the demand for dietary quality: Evidence from Russia during transition," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 19(C), pages 184-203.
    3. Okrent, Abigail & Sweitzer, Megan, 2016. "Obesity as a Modifier of Price Sensitivity in the United States," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 236251, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

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    Keywords

    Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety; Health Economics and Policy;

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