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Global Agricultural Reform And U.S. Agricultural Adjustment Capacity

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Listed:
  • Hanson, Kenneth
  • Burfisher, Mary E.
  • Hopkins, Jeffrey W.
  • Somwaru, Agapi

Abstract

This paper focuses on U.S. agriculture response to policy reform. A growing body of empirical literature describes the potential aggregate gains for the U.S. markets if global agricultural tariffs and subsidies can be further reduced (USDA, 2001; World Bank, GEP 2002; Tokarick, 2003). These gains are based on an aggregation of expected responses at the micro-level, by firms and households, to changing market conditions. Some of them will be "gainers" whose current economic activities and assets will benefit from the new opportunities presented by policy reform. Some will be "losers" who are adversely affected by the reduction or loss of subsidies or import protection.

Suggested Citation

  • Hanson, Kenneth & Burfisher, Mary E. & Hopkins, Jeffrey W. & Somwaru, Agapi, 2004. "Global Agricultural Reform And U.S. Agricultural Adjustment Capacity," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 20348, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea04:20348
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Magee, Christopher, 2001. "Administered protection for workers: an analysis of the trade adjustment assistance program," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(1), pages 105-125, February.
    2. Dohlman, Erik & Hoffman, Linwood A. & Young, C. Edwin, 2003. "U.S. Peanut Markets Adjust to Policy Reform," Policy Reform and Adjustment Workshop, October 23-25, 2003, Imperial College London, Wye Campus 15732, International Agricultural Policy Reform and Adjustment Project (IAPRAP).
    3. Brander, James A. & Spencer, Barbara J., 1994. "Trade adjustment assistance : Welfare and incentive effects of payments to displaced workers," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(3-4), pages 239-261, May.
    4. Lori G. Kletzer & Robert E. Litan, 2001. "A Prescription to Relieve Worker Anxiety," Policy Briefs PB01-02, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
    5. McBride, William D. & El-Osta, Hisham S., 2002. "Impacts Of The Adoption Of Genetically Engineered Crops On Farm Financial Performance," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 34(01), April.
    6. Lori G. Kletzer, 1998. "Job Displacement," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(1), pages 115-136, Winter.
    7. Bruce C. Fallick, 1996. "A Review of the Recent Empirical Literature on Displaced Workers," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 50(1), pages 5-16, October.
    8. Hoppe, Robert A. & Perry, Janet E. & Banker, David E., 2000. "ERS Farm Typology for a Diverse Agricultural Sector," Agricultural Information Bulletins 33657, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    9. Henry Farber, 2003. "Job Loss in the United States, 1981-2001," NBER Working Papers 9707, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Keywords

    Agricultural and Food Policy;

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