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Using Brexit To Identify the Nature of Price Rigidities

In: NBER International Seminar on Macroeconomics 2020

Author

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  • Bart Hobijn
  • Fernanda Nechio
  • Adam Hale Shapiro

Abstract

Using price quote data that underpin the official U.K. consumer price index (CPI), we analyze the effects of the unexpected passing of the Brexit referendum to the dynamics of price adjustments. The sizable depreciation of the British pound that immediately followed Brexit works as a quasi-experiment, enabling us to study the transmission of a large common marginal cost shock to inflation as well as the distribution of prices within granular product categories. A large portion of the inflationary effect is attributable to the size of price adjustments, implying that a time-dependent price-setting model can match the response of aggregate inflation reasonably well. The state-dependent model fares better in capturing the endogenous selection of price changes at the lower end of the price distribution, however, it misses on the magnitude of the adjustment conditional on selection.
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Suggested Citation

  • Bart Hobijn & Fernanda Nechio & Adam Hale Shapiro, 2020. "Using Brexit To Identify the Nature of Price Rigidities," NBER Chapters, in: NBER International Seminar on Macroeconomics 2020, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:14516
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    Cited by:

    1. Fernandes, Ana P. & Winters, L. Alan, 2021. "Exporters and shocks: The impact of the Brexit vote shock on bilateral exports to the UK," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 131(C).

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • D40 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - General
    • F31 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Exchange

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