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David Rothschild

Personal Details

First Name:David
Middle Name:
Last Name:Rothschild
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pro1033
http://researchdmr.com/
Twitter: @davmicrot

Affiliation

Microsoft Research

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/research/group/microeconomics/
New York City

Research output

as
Jump to: Articles

Articles

  1. Wang, Wei & Rothschild, David & Goel, Sharad & Gelman, Andrew, 2015. "Forecasting elections with non-representative polls," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 980-991.
  2. Rothschild, David, 2015. "Combining forecasts for elections: Accurate, relevant, and timely," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 952-964.
  3. Daniel G. Goldstein & David Rothschild, 2014. "Lay understanding of probability distributions," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 9(1), pages 1-14, January.
  4. Rothschild, David & Pennock, David M., 2014. "The extent of price misalignment in prediction markets," Algorithmic Finance, IOS Press, vol. 3(1-2), pages 3-20.
  5. Florian Teschner & David Rothschild, 2012. "Simplifying Market Access: A New Confidence-Based Interface," Journal of Prediction Markets, University of Buckingham Press, vol. 6(3), pages 27-41.
  6. Florian Teschner & David Rothschild & Henner Gimpel, 0. "Manipulation in Conditional Decision Markets," Group Decision and Negotiation, Springer, vol. 0, pages 1-19.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Articles

  1. Wang, Wei & Rothschild, David & Goel, Sharad & Gelman, Andrew, 2015. "Forecasting elections with non-representative polls," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 980-991.

    Cited by:

    1. Mark Huberty, 2015. "Awaiting the Second Big Data Revolution: From Digital Noise to Value Creation," Journal of Industry, Competition and Trade, Springer, vol. 15(1), pages 35-47, March.
    2. John L. Czajka & Amy Beyler, "undated". "Declining Response Rates in Federal Surveys: Trends and Implications (Background Paper)," Mathematica Policy Research Reports a714f76e878f4a74a6ad9f15d, Mathematica Policy Research.
    3. Andrew Gelman & Christian Hennig, 2017. "Beyond subjective and objective in statistics," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 180(4), pages 967-1033, October.
    4. Huberty, Mark, 2015. "Can we vote with our tweet? On the perennial difficulty of election forecasting with social media," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 992-1007.

  2. Rothschild, David, 2015. "Combining forecasts for elections: Accurate, relevant, and timely," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 952-964.

    Cited by:

    1. Munzert, Simon, 2017. "Forecasting elections at the constituency level: A correction–combination procedure," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 467-481.
    2. Urmee Khan & Robert Lieli, 2017. "Information Flow Between Prediction Markets, Polls and Media: Evidence from the 2008 Presidential Primaries," Working Papers 201711, University of California at Riverside, Department of Economics.
    3. Rajiv Sethi & Jennifer Wortman Vaughan, 2016. "Belief Aggregation with Automated Market Makers," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 48(1), pages 155-178, June.

  3. Daniel G. Goldstein & David Rothschild, 2014. "Lay understanding of probability distributions," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 9(1), pages 1-14, January.

    Cited by:

    1. Huck, Steffen & Schmidt, Tobias & Weizsäcker, Georg, 2014. "The standard portfolio choice problem in Germany," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Economics of Change SP II 2014-308, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
    2. W.J. Wouter Botzen & Howard Kunreuther & Erwann Michel-Kerjan, 2015. "Divergence between individual perceptions and objective indicators of tail risks: Evidence from floodplain residents in New York City," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 10(4), pages 365-385, July.
    3. Cornelia Betsch & Niels Haase & Frank Renkewitz & Philipp Schmid, 2015. "The narrative bias revisited: What drives the biasing influence of narrative information on risk perceptions?," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 10(3), pages 241-264, May.
    4. Lionel Page & Daniel G. Goldstein, 2016. "Subjective beliefs about the income distribution and preferences for redistribution," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 47(1), pages 25-61, June.

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

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