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Fernanda Leite Lopez de Leon

Personal Details

First Name:Fernanda
Middle Name:
Last Name:Leite Lopez de Leon
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:ple546
Terminal Degree:2010 Department of Economics; Cornell University (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

School of Economics
University of Kent

Canterbury, United Kingdom
http://www.kent.ac.uk/economics/

: +44 (0) 1227 827497

Keynes College, Canterbury, Kent, CT2 7NP
RePEc:edi:deukcuk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles Chapters

Working papers

  1. Raquel Campos & Fernanda L. L. de Leon & Ben McQuillin, 2017. "Lost in the Storm: The Academic Collaborations that Went Missing in Hurricane Isaac," Studies in Economics 1707, School of Economics, University of Kent.
  2. Fernanda L. L. de Leon & Ben McQuillin, 2014. "The Role of Conferences on the Pathway to Academic Impact: Evidence from a Natural Experiment," Studies in Economics 1408, School of Economics, University of Kent.
  3. Fernanda L L de Leon & Renata Rizzi, 2014. "Does Forced Voting Result in Political Polarization?," University of East Anglia Applied and Financial Economics Working Paper Series 064, School of Economics, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK..
  4. Fernanda Leite Lopez de Leon, 2010. "Endorse or Not to Endorse: Understanding the Determinants of Newspapers' Likelihood of Making Political Recommendations," University of East Anglia Applied and Financial Economics Working Paper Series 022, School of Economics, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK..

Articles

  1. Camila F. S. Campos & Shaun Hargreaves Heap & Fernanda Leite Lopez de Leon, 2017. "The political influence of peer groups: experimental evidence in the classroom," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 69(4), pages 963-985.
  2. Fernanda Leite Lopez de Leon & Renata Rizzi, 2014. "A Test for the Rational Ignorance Hypothesis: Evidence from a Natural Experiment in Brazil," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 6(4), pages 380-398, November.
  3. Leite Lopez de Leon Fernanda, 2013. "The Tuesday Advantage of Politicians Endorsed by American Newspapers," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 13(2), pages 865-886, October.

Chapters

  1. Eduardo A. Haddad & Geoffrey J. D. Hewings & Fernanda Leite Lopez de Leon, 2002. "Building-up influence: post-war industrialization in the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil," Anais do X Seminário sobre a Economia Mineira [Proceedings of the 10th Seminar on the Economy of Minas Gerais],in: João Antonio de Paula & et alli (ed.), Anais do X Seminário sobre a Economia Mineira [Proceedings of the 10th Seminar on the Economy of Minas Gerais] Cedeplar, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Fernanda L. L. de Leon & Ben McQuillin, 2014. "The Role of Conferences on the Pathway to Academic Impact: Evidence from a Natural Experiment," Studies in Economics 1408, School of Economics, University of Kent.

    Cited by:

    1. Paul Kudlow & Matthew Cockerill & Danielle Toccalino & Devin Bissky Dziadyk & Alan Rutledge & Aviv Shachak & Roger S. McIntyre & Arun Ravindran & Gunther Eysenbach, 2017. "Online distribution channel increases article usage on Mendeley: a randomized controlled trial," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 112(3), pages 1537-1556, September.
    2. Raquel Campos & Fernanda L. L. de Leon & Ben McQuillin, 2017. "Lost in the Storm: The Academic Collaborations that Went Missing in Hurricane Isaac," Studies in Economics 1707, School of Economics, University of Kent.

  2. Fernanda L L de Leon & Renata Rizzi, 2014. "Does Forced Voting Result in Political Polarization?," University of East Anglia Applied and Financial Economics Working Paper Series 064, School of Economics, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK..

    Cited by:

    1. Gäbler, Stefanie & Potrafke, Niklas & Rösel, Felix, 2017. "Compulsory Voting, Voter Turnout and Asymmetrical Habit-formation," Annual Conference 2017 (Vienna): Alternative Structures for Money and Banking 168074, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

Articles

  1. Fernanda Leite Lopez de Leon & Renata Rizzi, 2014. "A Test for the Rational Ignorance Hypothesis: Evidence from a Natural Experiment in Brazil," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 6(4), pages 380-398, November.

    Cited by:

    1. Gianmarco León, 2015. "Turnout, Political Preferences and Information: Experimental Evidence from Peru," Working Papers 691, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    2. Mitchell Hoffman & Gianmarco León & María Lombardi, 2016. "Compulsory Voting, Turnout, and Government Spending: Evidence from Austria," NBER Working Papers 22221, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Niklas Potrafke & Felix Rösel, 2016. "Opening Hours of Polling Stations and Voter Turnout: Evidence from a Natural Experiment," CESifo Working Paper Series 6036, CESifo Group Munich.
    4. Lydia Mechtenberg & Jean-Robert Tyran, 2016. "Voter Motivation and the Quality of Democratic Choice," Discussion Papers 16-13, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
    5. Raphael Bruce & Rafael Costa Lima, 2015. "Compulsory Voting and TV News Consumption," Working Papers, Department of Economics 2015_48, University of São Paulo (FEA-USP), revised 12 Jun 2017.
    6. Fernanda Leite Lopez Leon & Renata Rizzi, 2016. "Does forced voting result in political polarization?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 166(1), pages 143-160, January.

Chapters

    Sorry, no citations of chapters recorded.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 4 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-CDM: Collective Decision-Making (2) 2010-12-18 2014-08-20
  2. NEP-POL: Positive Political Economics (2) 2010-12-18 2014-08-20

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