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Fernanda Leite Lopez de Leon

Personal Details

First Name:Fernanda
Middle Name:
Last Name:Leite Lopez de Leon
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:ple546
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
Terminal Degree:2010 Department of Economics; Cornell University (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

School of Economics
University of Kent

Canterbury, United Kingdom
http://www.kent.ac.uk/economics/
RePEc:edi:deukcuk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles Chapters

Working papers

  1. Fernanda L. Lopez de Leon & Markus Bindemann, 2019. "Social Effects of the Vote of the Majority: A Field-Experiment on the Brexit-Vote," Studies in Economics 1905, School of Economics, University of Kent.
  2. Raquel Campos & Fernanda L. L. de Leon & Ben McQuillin, 2017. "Lost in the Storm: The Academic Collaborations that Went Missing in Hurricane Isaac," Studies in Economics 1707, School of Economics, University of Kent.
  3. Fernanda L. L. de Leon & Ben McQuillin, 2014. "The Role of Conferences on the Pathway to Academic Impact: Evidence from a Natural Experiment," Studies in Economics 1408, School of Economics, University of Kent.
  4. Fernanda L L de Leon & Renata Rizzi, 2014. "Does Forced Voting Result in Political Polarization?," University of East Anglia Applied and Financial Economics Working Paper Series 064, School of Economics, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK..
  5. Fernanda Leite Lopez de Leon, 2010. "Endorse or Not to Endorse: Understanding the Determinants of Newspapers' Likelihood of Making Political Recommendations," University of East Anglia Applied and Financial Economics Working Paper Series 022, School of Economics, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK..

Articles

  1. Fernanda Leite Lopez de Leon & Ben McQuillin, 2020. "The Role of Conferences on the Pathway to Academic Impact Evidence from a Natural Experiment," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 55(1), pages 164-193.
  2. Camila F. S. Campos & Shaun Hargreaves Heap & Fernanda Leite Lopez de Leon, 2017. "The political influence of peer groups: experimental evidence in the classroom," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 69(4), pages 963-985.
  3. Fernanda Leite Lopez de Leon & Renata Rizzi, 2014. "A Test for the Rational Ignorance Hypothesis: Evidence from a Natural Experiment in Brazil," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 6(4), pages 380-398, November.
  4. Leite Lopez de Leon Fernanda, 2013. "The Tuesday Advantage of Politicians Endorsed by American Newspapers," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 13(2), pages 865-886, October.

Chapters

  1. Eduardo A. Haddad & Geoffrey J. D. Hewings & Fernanda Leite Lopez de Leon, 2002. "Building-up influence: post-war industrialization in the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil," Anais do X Seminário sobre a Economia Mineira [Proceedings of the 10th Seminar on the Economy of Minas Gerais], in: João Antonio de Paula & et alli (ed.),Anais do X Seminário sobre a Economia Mineira [Proceedings of the 10th Seminar on the Economy of Minas Gerais], Cedeplar, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Raquel Campos & Fernanda L. L. de Leon & Ben McQuillin, 2017. "Lost in the Storm: The Academic Collaborations that Went Missing in Hurricane Isaac," Studies in Economics 1707, School of Economics, University of Kent.

    Cited by:

    1. Jens Foerderer, 2020. "Interfirm Exchange and Innovation in Platform Ecosystems: Evidence from Apple’s Worldwide Developers Conference," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 66(10), pages 4772-4787, October.
    2. Ina Ganguli & Fabian Waldinger, 2023. "War and Science in Ukraine," NBER Working Papers 31449, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Laura Hospido & Carlos Sanz, 2021. "Gender Gaps in the Evaluation of Research: Evidence from Submissions to Economics Conferences," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 83(3), pages 590-618, June.
    4. Asier Minondo, 2020. "Who presents and where? An analysis of research seminars in US economics departments," Papers 2001.10561, arXiv.org, revised May 2020.
    5. Biermann, Marcus, 2021. "Remote talks: changes to economics seminars during Covid-19," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 114429, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    6. Önder, Ali Sina & Schweitzer, Sascha & Yilmazkuday, Hakan, 2021. "Specialization, field distance, and quality in economists’ collaborations," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 15(4).
    7. Enrico Berkes & Peter Nencka, 2019. "‘Novel’ Ideas: The Effects of Carnegie Libraries on Innovative Activities," 2019 Meeting Papers 1315, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    8. Yuriy Gorodnichenko & Tho Pham & Oleksandr Talavera, 2019. "Conference Presentations and Academic Publishing," Discussion Papers 19-10, Department of Economics, University of Birmingham.
    9. Dennis Essers & Francesco Grigoli & Evgenia Pugacheva, 2022. "Network effects and research collaborations: evidence from IMF Working Paper co-authorship," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 127(12), pages 7169-7192, December.
    10. Marcus Biermann, 2021. "Remote talks: changes to economics seminars during Covid-19," CEP Discussion Papers dp1759, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    11. Toivanen, Otto & Spiegel, Yossi, 2022. "From conference submission to publication and citations: Evidence from the EARIE conference," CEPR Discussion Papers 16990, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    12. Rose, Michael E. & Georg, Co-Pierre, 2021. "What 5,000 acknowledgements tell us about informal collaboration in financial economics," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 50(6).
    13. Christian Catalini & Christian Fons-Rosen & Patrick Gaulé, 2020. "How Do Travel Costs Shape Collaboration?," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 66(8), pages 3340-3360, August.
    14. Biermann, Marcus, 2024. "Remote talks: Changes to economics seminars during COVID-19," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 163(C).
    15. Misha Teplitskiy & Soya Park & Neil Thompson & David Karger, 2022. "Intentional and serendipitous diffusion of ideas: Evidence from academic conferences," Papers 2209.01175, arXiv.org, revised Jan 2024.
    16. Baruffaldi, Stefano & Poege, Felix, 2020. "A Firm Scientific Community: Industry Participation and Knowledge Diffusion," IZA Discussion Papers 13419, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    17. Jacqueline N. Lane & Ina Ganguli & Patrick Gaule & Eva Guinan & Karim R. Lakhani, 2021. "Engineering serendipity: When does knowledge sharing lead to knowledge production?," Strategic Management Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 42(6), pages 1215-1244, June.

  2. Fernanda L. L. de Leon & Ben McQuillin, 2014. "The Role of Conferences on the Pathway to Academic Impact: Evidence from a Natural Experiment," Studies in Economics 1408, School of Economics, University of Kent.

    Cited by:

    1. Asier Minondo, 2020. "Who presents and where? An analysis of research seminars in US economics departments," Papers 2001.10561, arXiv.org, revised May 2020.
    2. Biermann, Marcus, 2021. "Remote talks: changes to economics seminars during Covid-19," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 114429, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    3. Yuriy Gorodnichenko & Tho Pham & Oleksandr Talavera, 2019. "Conference Presentations and Academic Publishing," Discussion Papers 19-10, Department of Economics, University of Birmingham.
    4. Georg, Co-Pierre & Opolot, Daniel & Rose, Michael, 2019. "Discussants," VfS Annual Conference 2019 (Leipzig): 30 Years after the Fall of the Berlin Wall - Democracy and Market Economy 203575, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    5. Marcus Biermann, 2021. "Remote talks: changes to economics seminars during Covid-19," CEP Discussion Papers dp1759, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    6. Toivanen, Otto & Spiegel, Yossi, 2022. "From conference submission to publication and citations: Evidence from the EARIE conference," CEPR Discussion Papers 16990, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    7. Yin, Xingbo & Zong, Xiaohua, 2022. "International student mobility spurs scientific research on foreign countries: Evidence from international students studying in China," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 16(1).
    8. Rose, Michael E. & Georg, Co-Pierre, 2021. "What 5,000 acknowledgements tell us about informal collaboration in financial economics," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 50(6).
    9. Raquel Campos & Fernanda Leon & Ben McQuillin, 2018. "Lost in the Storm: The Academic Collaborations That Went Missing in Hurricane ISSAC," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 128(610), pages 995-1018, May.
    10. Paul Kudlow & Matthew Cockerill & Danielle Toccalino & Devin Bissky Dziadyk & Alan Rutledge & Aviv Shachak & Roger S. McIntyre & Arun Ravindran & Gunther Eysenbach, 2017. "Online distribution channel increases article usage on Mendeley: a randomized controlled trial," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 112(3), pages 1537-1556, September.
    11. Biermann, Marcus, 2024. "Remote talks: Changes to economics seminars during COVID-19," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 163(C).
    12. Asier Minondo, 2022. "Comments are welcome," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 127(3), pages 1565-1582, March.
    13. John Manuel Barrios & Laura Giuliano & Andrew J. Leone, 2020. "In Living Color: Does In-Person Screening Affect Who Gets Hired?," Working Papers 2020-38, Becker Friedman Institute for Research In Economics.
    14. Baruffaldi, Stefano & Poege, Felix, 2020. "A Firm Scientific Community: Industry Participation and Knowledge Diffusion," IZA Discussion Papers 13419, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

  3. Fernanda L L de Leon & Renata Rizzi, 2014. "Does Forced Voting Result in Political Polarization?," University of East Anglia Applied and Financial Economics Working Paper Series 064, School of Economics, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK..

    Cited by:

    1. Gaebler, Stefanie & Potrafke, Niklas & Roesel, Felix, 2020. "Compulsory voting and political participation: Empirical evidence from Austria," Munich Reprints in Economics 84756, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
    2. Gäbler, Stefanie & Potrafke, Niklas & Rösel, Felix, 2017. "Compulsory Voting, Voter Turnout and Asymmetrical Habit-formation," VfS Annual Conference 2017 (Vienna): Alternative Structures for Money and Banking 168074, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

Articles

  1. Fernanda Leite Lopez de Leon & Ben McQuillin, 2020. "The Role of Conferences on the Pathway to Academic Impact Evidence from a Natural Experiment," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 55(1), pages 164-193.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Camila F. S. Campos & Shaun Hargreaves Heap & Fernanda Leite Lopez de Leon, 2017. "The political influence of peer groups: experimental evidence in the classroom," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 69(4), pages 963-985.

    Cited by:

    1. Fernanda L. Lopez de Leon & Markus Bindemann, 2019. "Social Effects of the Vote of the Majority: A Field-Experiment on the Brexit-Vote," Studies in Economics 1905, School of Economics, University of Kent.
    2. Sergio Pinto & Panka Bencsik & Tuugi Chuluun & Carol Graham, 2019. "Presidential Elections, Divided Politics, and Happiness in the U.S," Working Papers 2019-015, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    3. Marchingiglio, Riccardo, 2021. "Local institutions and public school spending under restricted suffrage: The case of post-unitary Italy," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 188(C), pages 1351-1373.

  3. Fernanda Leite Lopez de Leon & Renata Rizzi, 2014. "A Test for the Rational Ignorance Hypothesis: Evidence from a Natural Experiment in Brazil," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 6(4), pages 380-398, November.

    Cited by:

    1. Francesco Capozza & Ingar Haaland & Christopher Roth & Johannes Wohlfart, 2021. "Studying Information Acquisition in the Field: A Practical Guide and Review," ECONtribute Discussion Papers Series 124, University of Bonn and University of Cologne, Germany.
    2. Gonzales Mariella & Gianmarco León-Ciliotta & Luis R. Martinez, 2018. "How effective are monetary incentives to vote? Evidence from a nationwide policy," Economics Working Papers 1667, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Jul 2019.
    3. Shaun P. Hargreaves Heap & Kei Tsutsui & Daniel J. Zizzo, 2020. "Vote and voice: an experiment on the effects of inclusive governance rules," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 54(1), pages 111-139, January.
    4. Gianmarco León, 2015. "Turnout, Political Preferences and Information: Experimental Evidence from Peru," Working Papers 691, Barcelona School of Economics.
    5. Alessandro, Martín & Cardinale Lagomarsino, Bruno & Scartascini, Carlos & Torrealday, Jerónimo, 2019. "Transparency and Trust in Government: Evidence from a Survey Experiment," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 9496, Inter-American Development Bank.
    6. Keefer, Philip & Vlaicu, Razvan, 2022. "Voting Age, Information Experiments, and Political Engagement: Evidence from a General Election," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 12642, Inter-American Development Bank.
    7. Potrafke, Niklas & Roesel, Felix, 2020. "Opening hours of polling stations and voter turnout: Evidence from a natural experiment," Munich Reprints in Economics 84723, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
    8. Mitchell Hoffman & Gianmarco León & María Lombardi, 2016. "Compulsory Voting, Turnout, and Government Spending: Evidence from Austria," NBER Working Papers 22221, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Nolan Ritter & Julia Anna Bingler, 2021. "Do homo sapiens know their prices? Insights on dysfunctional price mechanisms from a large field experiment," CER-ETH Economics working paper series 21/348, CER-ETH - Center of Economic Research (CER-ETH) at ETH Zurich.
    10. Mechtenberg, Lydia & Tyran, Jean-Robert, 2019. "Voter motivation and the quality of democratic choice," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 241-259.
    11. Francesco Capozza & Ingar K. Haaland & Christopher Roth & Johannes Wohlfart, 2022. "Recent Advances in Studies of News Consumption," CESifo Working Paper Series 10021, CESifo.
    12. Bertschek Irene & Müller David F., 2023. "Political Ignorance and the Internet," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 243(1), pages 3-28, February.
    13. Raphael Bruce & Rafael Costa Lima, 2015. "Compulsory Voting and TV News Consumption," Working Papers, Department of Economics 2015_48, University of São Paulo (FEA-USP), revised 12 Jun 2017.
    14. Jonas Jessen & Daniel Kuehnle & Markus Wagner, 2021. "Is Voting Really Habit-Forming and Transformative? Long-Run Effects of Earlier Eligibility on Turnout and Political Involvement from the UK," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1973, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    15. Carroll, Eamonn & Timmons, Shane & McGinnity, Frances, 2023. "Experimental tests of public support for disability policy," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number RS159, September.
    16. Fernanda Leite Lopez Leon & Renata Rizzi, 2016. "Does forced voting result in political polarization?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 166(1), pages 143-160, January.
    17. Mariani, Lucas Argentieri & Gagete-Miranda, Jessica & Rettl, Paula, 2020. "Words can hurt: how political communication can change the pace of an epidemic," OSF Preprints ps2wx, Center for Open Science.
    18. Niklas Potrafke & Felix Rösel, 2018. "What are the Results of Longer Opening Hours of Polling Stations?," ifo Schnelldienst, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 71(05), pages 23-26, March.
    19. Asatryan, Zareh, 2022. "Representing the future in aging societies: Policy implications of the voting age reform in Germany," ZEW Expert Briefs 22-04, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
    20. Jessen, Jonas & Kühnle, Daniel & Wagner, Markus, 2021. "Downstream Effects of Voting on Turnout and Political Preferences: Long-Run Evidence from the UK," IZA Discussion Papers 14296, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

  4. Leite Lopez de Leon Fernanda, 2013. "The Tuesday Advantage of Politicians Endorsed by American Newspapers," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 13(2), pages 865-886, October.

    Cited by:

    1. Fernanda Leite Lopez Leon, 2016. "Endorse or Not to Endorse: Understanding the Determinants of Newspapers’ Likelihood of Making Political Recommendations," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 63(4), pages 357-376, September.

Chapters

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More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 3 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-POL: Positive Political Economics (3) 2010-12-18 2014-08-20 2019-05-20
  2. NEP-CDM: Collective Decision-Making (2) 2010-12-18 2014-08-20
  3. NEP-BEC: Business Economics (1) 2019-05-20
  4. NEP-EUR: Microeconomic European Issues (1) 2019-05-20
  5. NEP-EXP: Experimental Economics (1) 2019-05-20
  6. NEP-INT: International Trade (1) 2019-05-20

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