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David Cameron

Personal Details

First Name:David
Middle Name:
Last Name:Cameron
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pca1065

Affiliation

(80%) McMaster Experimental Economics Laboratory (McEEL)
Department of Economics
McMaster University

Hamilton, Canada
http://mceel.mcmaster.ca/

(905) 525-9140 x23757
(905) 521-8232
(905) 525-9140 ext. 22765
RePEc:edi:mceelca (more details at EDIRC)

(20%) Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis (CHEPA)
McMaster University

Hamilton, Canada
http://www.chepa.org/

(905) 525-9140, extension 22122
(905) 546-5211
CRL Building, 282, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1
RePEc:edi:chepaca (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Neil Buckley & Katherine Cuff & Jeremiah Hurley & Stuart Mestelman & Stephanie Thomas & David Cameron, 2014. "Should I Stay or Should I Go? Public Provision of a Private Good with an Exit Option," Department of Economics Working Papers 2014-01, McMaster University.
  2. Neil Buckley & Katherine Cuff & Jeremiah Hurley & Stuart Mestelman & Stephanie Thomas & David Cameron, 2013. "Support for Public Provision with Top-Up and Opt-Out: A Controlled Laboratory Experiment," Department of Economics Working Papers 2013-15, McMaster University.
  3. Neil J. Buckley & Katherine Cuff & Jeremiah Hurley & Logan McLeod & Stuart Mestelman & David Cameron, 2012. "An Experimental Investigation of Mixed Systems of Public and Private Health Care Finance," Department of Economics Working Papers 2012-02, McMaster University.
  4. Neil Buckley & Katherine Cuff & Jeremiah Hurley & Logan McLeod & Robert Nuscheler & David Cameron, 2010. "Willingness-to-Pay for Parallel Private Health Insurance: Evidence from Laboratory Experiment," Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis Working Paper Series 2010-02, Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis (CHEPA), McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada.
  5. Aleksandra Gajic & David Cameron & Jeremiah Hurley, 2010. "The Impact of Alternative Incentives on Response and Retention in a Mixed-Mode Survey," Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis Working Paper Series 2010-03, Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis (CHEPA), McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada.
  6. Jeremiah Hurely & Neil Buckley & Katherine Cuff & Mita Giacomini & David Cameron, 2009. "Preferences over the Fair Division of Goods: Information, Good, and Sample Effects in a Health Context," Department of Economics Working Papers 2009-01, McMaster University.

Articles

  1. Neil J. Buckley & Katherine Cuff & Jeremiah Hurley & Logan McLeod & Robert Nuscheler & David Cameron, 2012. "Willingness-to-pay for parallel private health insurance: evidence from a laboratory experiment," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 45(1), pages 137-166, February.
  2. Aleksandra Gajic & David Cameron & Jeremiah Hurley, 2012. "The cost-effectiveness of cash versus lottery incentives for a web-based, stated-preference community survey," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 13(6), pages 789-799, December.
  3. Buckley, Neil J. & Cuff, Katherine & Hurley, Jeremiah & McLeod, Logan & Mestelman, Stuart & Cameron, David, 2012. "An experimental investigation of mixed systems of public and private health care finance," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 84(3), pages 713-729.
  4. Jeremiah Hurley & Neil Buckley & Katherine Cuff & Mita Giacomini & David Cameron, 2011. "Judgments regarding the fair division of goods: the impact of verbal versus quantitative descriptions of alternative divisions," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 37(2), pages 341-372, July.
  5. David Cameron & Richard Simeon, 2002. "Intergovernmental Relations in Canada: The Emergence of Collaborative Federalism," Publius: The Journal of Federalism, Oxford University Press, vol. 32(2), pages 49-72, Spring.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Neil Buckley & Katherine Cuff & Jeremiah Hurley & Stuart Mestelman & Stephanie Thomas & David Cameron, 2014. "Should I Stay or Should I Go? Public Provision of a Private Good with an Exit Option," Department of Economics Working Papers 2014-01, McMaster University.

    Cited by:

    1. Buckley, Neil & Cuff, Katherine & Hurley, Jeremiah & Mestelman, Stuart & Thomas, Stephanie & Cameron, David, 2015. "Support for public provision of a private good with top-up and opt-out: A controlled laboratory experiment," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 177-196.

  2. Neil J. Buckley & Katherine Cuff & Jeremiah Hurley & Logan McLeod & Stuart Mestelman & David Cameron, 2012. "An Experimental Investigation of Mixed Systems of Public and Private Health Care Finance," Department of Economics Working Papers 2012-02, McMaster University.

    Cited by:

    1. Huck, Steffen & Lünser, Gabriele & Spitzer, Florian & Tyran, Jean-Robert, 2016. "Medical insurance and free choice of physician shape patient overtreatment: A laboratory experiment," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Economics of Change SP II 2014-307r, WZB Berlin Social Science Center.
    2. Norma Burow & Miriam Beblo & Denis Beninger & Melanie Schröder, 2017. "Why Do Women Favor Same-Gender Competition? Evidence from a Choice Experiment," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1662, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    3. Obrizan, Maksym, 2017. "Does EU membership prevent crowding out of public health care? Evidence from 28 transition countries," MPRA Paper 81708, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Brosig-Koch, Jeannette & Hennig-Schmidt, Heike & Kairies-Schwarz, Nadja & Wiesen, Daniel, 2016. "Using artefactual field and lab experiments to investigate how fee-for-service and capitation affect medical service provision," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 131(PB), pages 17-23.
    5. Hennig-Schmidt, Heike & Wiesen, Daniel, 2014. "Other-regarding behavior and motivation in health care provision: An experiment with medical and non-medical students," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 156-165.
    6. Kairies-Schwarz, Nadja & Kokot, Johanna & Vomhof, Markus & Weßling, Jens, 2017. "Health insurance choice and risk preferences under cumulative prospect theory – an experiment," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 137(C), pages 374-397.
    7. Alejandro Arrieta & Ariadna García-Prado & Paula González & Jose Luis Pinto-Prades, 2016. "Risk Attitudes in Medical Decisions for Others: An Experimental Approach," Working Papers 16.07, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Department of Economics.
    8. Brosig-Koch, Jeannette & Hennig-Schmidt, Heike & Kairies-Schwarz, Nadja & Wiesen, Daniel, 2015. "The Effects of Introducing Mixed Payment Systems for Physicians – Experimental Evidence," Ruhr Economic Papers 543, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    9. Obrizan, Maksym, 2019. "Diverging trends in health care use between 2010 and 2016: Evidence from three groups of transition countries," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 43(1), pages 19-29.
    10. Castro, Massimo Finocchiaro & Ferrara, Paolo Lorenzo & Guccio, Calogero & Lisi, Domenico, 2019. "Medical malpractice liability and physicians’ behavior: Experimental evidence," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 166(C), pages 646-666.
    11. Guidon Fenig & Mariya Mileva & Luba Petersen, 2013. "Asset Trading and Monetary Policy in Production Economies," Discussion Papers dp13-08, Department of Economics, Simon Fraser University, revised Aug 2014.
    12. Castro, M.F.; & Ferrara, P.; & Guccio, C.; & Lisi, D.;, 2018. "Medical Malpractice Liability and Physicians’ Behavior:Experimental Evidence," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 18/11, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    13. Nathan Kettlewell, 2016. "Policy Choice and Product Bundling in a Complicated Health Insurance Market: Do People get it Right?," Discussion Papers 2016-16, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.

  3. Neil Buckley & Katherine Cuff & Jeremiah Hurley & Logan McLeod & Robert Nuscheler & David Cameron, 2010. "Willingness-to-Pay for Parallel Private Health Insurance: Evidence from Laboratory Experiment," Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis Working Paper Series 2010-02, Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis (CHEPA), McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada.

    Cited by:

    1. Neil J. Buckley & Katherine Cuff & Jeremiah Hurley & Logan McLeod & Stuart Mestelman & David Cameron, 2012. "An Experimental Investigation of Mixed Systems of Public and Private Health Care Finance," Department of Economics Working Papers 2012-02, McMaster University.
    2. Luba Petersen & Guidon Fenig, 2015. "Distributing scarce jobs and output: Experimental evidence on the effects of rationing," Discussion Papers dp15-02, Department of Economics, Simon Fraser University.
    3. Pfarr, Christian & Schmid, Andreas, 2013. "The political economics of social health insurance: the tricky case of individuals’ preferences," MPRA Paper 44534, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Raquel J. Fonseca & Luísa Cunha, 0. "A net present value approach to health insurance choice," Decisions in Economics and Finance, Springer;Associazione per la Matematica, vol. 0, pages 1-16.
    5. Guidon Fenig & Mariya Mileva & Luba Petersen, 2013. "Asset Trading and Monetary Policy in Production Economies," Discussion Papers dp13-08, Department of Economics, Simon Fraser University, revised Aug 2014.
    6. Martina Grunow & Robert Nuscheler, 2010. "Public and Private Health Insurance in Germany: The Ignored Risk Selection Problem," Discussion Paper Series 312, Universitaet Augsburg, Institute for Economics.
    7. Meliyanni Johar & Glenn Jones & Michael P. Keane & Elizabeth Savage & Olena Stavrunova, 2013. "The Demand for Private Health Insurance: Do Waiting Lists Matter?” – Revisited," Economics Papers 2013-W09, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
    8. Andreas Richter & Jörg Schiller & Harris Schlesinger, 2014. "Behavioral insurance: Theory and experiments," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 48(2), pages 85-96, April.
    9. Guidon Fenig & Luba Petersen, 2017. "Distributing scarce jobs and output: experimental evidence on the dynamic effects of rationing," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 20(3), pages 707-735, September.

Articles

  1. Neil J. Buckley & Katherine Cuff & Jeremiah Hurley & Logan McLeod & Robert Nuscheler & David Cameron, 2012. "Willingness-to-pay for parallel private health insurance: evidence from a laboratory experiment," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 45(1), pages 137-166, February.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Aleksandra Gajic & David Cameron & Jeremiah Hurley, 2012. "The cost-effectiveness of cash versus lottery incentives for a web-based, stated-preference community survey," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 13(6), pages 789-799, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Menegaki, Angeliki, N. & Olsen, Søren Bøye & Tsagarakis, Konstantinos P., 2016. "Towards a common standard – A reporting checklist for web-based stated preference valuation surveys and a critique for mode surveys," Journal of choice modelling, Elsevier, vol. 18(C), pages 18-50.
    2. Jeremiah Hurley & Emmanouil Mentzakis & Mita Giacomini & Deirdre DeJean & Michel Grignon, 2017. "Non-market resource allocation and the public’s interpretation of need: an empirical investigation in the context of health care," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 49(1), pages 117-143, June.
    3. Cauane Blumenberg & Aluísio J. D. Barros, 2018. "Response rate differences between web and alternative data collection methods for public health research: a systematic review of the literature," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 63(6), pages 765-773, July.
    4. Uttam Khanal & Clevo Wilson & Shunsuke Managi & Boon Lee & Viet-Ngu Hoang & Robert Gifford, 2018. "Psychological influence on survey incentives: valuing climate change adaptation benefits in agriculture," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 20(2), pages 305-324, April.
    5. Pierre-Alexandre Mahieu & Romain Crastes & Jordan Louviere & Ewa Zawojska, 2016. "Rewarding truthful-telling in stated preference studies," Working Papers 2016-33, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw.

  3. Buckley, Neil J. & Cuff, Katherine & Hurley, Jeremiah & McLeod, Logan & Mestelman, Stuart & Cameron, David, 2012. "An experimental investigation of mixed systems of public and private health care finance," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 84(3), pages 713-729.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. Jeremiah Hurley & Neil Buckley & Katherine Cuff & Mita Giacomini & David Cameron, 2011. "Judgments regarding the fair division of goods: the impact of verbal versus quantitative descriptions of alternative divisions," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 37(2), pages 341-372, July.

    Cited by:

    1. Amy Givler Chapman & John E. Mitchell, 2018. "A fair division approach to humanitarian logistics inspired by conditional value-at-risk," Annals of Operations Research, Springer, vol. 262(1), pages 133-151, March.
    2. Dean Spears, 2017. "Making people happy or making happy people? Questionnaire-experimental studies of population ethics and policy," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 49(1), pages 145-169, June.
    3. Benoît Tarroux, 2018. "The value of tax progressivity: Evidence from Survey experiment," Post-Print halshs-02001270, HAL.
    4. Cookson, Richard & Ali, Shehzad & Tsuchiya, Aki & Asaria, Miqdad, 2018. "E‐learning and health inequality aversion: a questionnaire experiment," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 89393, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    5. Jeremiah Hurley & Emmanouil Mentzakis & Mita Giacomini & Deirdre DeJean & Michel Grignon, 2017. "Non-market resource allocation and the public’s interpretation of need: an empirical investigation in the context of health care," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 49(1), pages 117-143, June.
    6. Aleksandra Gajic & David Cameron & Jeremiah Hurley, 2012. "The cost-effectiveness of cash versus lottery incentives for a web-based, stated-preference community survey," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 13(6), pages 789-799, December.

  5. David Cameron & Richard Simeon, 2002. "Intergovernmental Relations in Canada: The Emergence of Collaborative Federalism," Publius: The Journal of Federalism, Oxford University Press, vol. 32(2), pages 49-72, Spring.

    Cited by:

    1. David J. Gordon, 2015. "An Uneasy Equilibrium: The Coordination of Climate Governance in Federated Systems," Global Environmental Politics, MIT Press, vol. 15(2), pages 121-141, May.
    2. Taylor R. Gray, 2010. "A Corporate Geography of Canada: Insights into a Multi‐Jurisdictional Model of Corporate Governance," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(4), pages 467-494, December.
    3. William R. Lowry, 2009. "Policy Changes on Canada's Rivers: Different but not Isolated," Review of Policy Research, Policy Studies Organization, vol. 26(6), pages 783-800, November.
    4. Isabel Narbón-Perpiñá & Diego Prior & Mª Teresa Balaguer-Coll & Emili Tortosa-Ausina, 2019. "Searching for the optimal territorial structure: The case of Spanish provincial councils," Working Papers 2019/03, Economics Department, Universitat Jaume I, Castellón (Spain).
    5. Gérard Boismenu & Peter Graefe, 2004. "The New Federal Tool Belt: Attempts to Rebuild Social Policy Leadership," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 30(1), pages 71-89, March.
    6. Prakash Chandra Jha, Prakash Chandra Jha, 2017. "Equalization Transfers in Canada: Emerging Challenges," MPRA Paper 82506, University Library of Munich, Germany.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 5 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-EXP: Experimental Economics (3) 2012-04-17 2013-11-22 2014-03-30
  2. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (3) 2009-02-14 2009-11-21 2012-04-17
  3. NEP-CDM: Collective Decision-Making (2) 2013-11-22 2014-03-30
  4. NEP-CBE: Cognitive & Behavioural Economics (1) 2013-11-22
  5. NEP-PBE: Public Economics (1) 2013-11-22
  6. NEP-PUB: Public Finance (1) 2014-03-30

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