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Tommy Wu

Personal Details

First Name:Tommy
Middle Name:
Last Name:Wu
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pwu93
Terminal Degree: Economics Department; Queen's University (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Hong Kong Monetary Authority

Central, Hong Kong
http://www.info.gov.hk/hkma/index.htm
RePEc:edi:magovhk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Dong He & Wei Liao & Tommy Wu, 2014. "Hong Kong's Growth Synchronisation with China and the U.S.: A Trend and Cycle Analysis," Working Papers 152014, Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research.
  2. Dong He & Lillian Cheung & Wenlang Zhang & Tommy Wu, 2012. "How would Capital Account Liberalisation Affect China's Capital Flows and the Renminbi Real Exchange Rates?," Working Papers 092012, Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research.
  3. Dong He & Wenlang Zhang & Gaofeng Han & Tommy Wu, 2012. "Productivity Growth of the Non-Tradable Sectors in China," Working Papers 082012, Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research.

Articles

  1. He, Dong & Liao, Wei & Wu, Tommy, 2015. "Hong Kong's growth synchronization with China and the US: A trend and cycle analysis," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 10-28.
  2. Wu, Tommy T., 2015. "Firm heterogeneity, trade, multinationals, and growth: A quantitative evaluation," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 97(2), pages 359-375.
  3. Dong He & Wenlang Zhang & Gaofeng Han & Tommy Wu, 2014. "Productivity Growth of the Nontradable Sectors in China," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 18(4), pages 655-666, November.
  4. Dong He & Lillian Cheung & Wenlang Zhang & Tommy Wu, 2012. "How would Capital Account Liberalization Affect China's Capital Flows and the Renminbi Real Exchange Rates?," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 20(6), pages 29-54, November.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Dong He & Lillian Cheung & Wenlang Zhang & Tommy Wu, 2012. "How would Capital Account Liberalisation Affect China's Capital Flows and the Renminbi Real Exchange Rates?," Working Papers 092012, Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research.

    Cited by:

    1. Dong He & Paul Luk, 2013. "A Model of Chinese Capital Account Liberalisation," Working Papers 122013, Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research.
    2. Rod TYERS, 2013. "China and Global Macroeconomic Interdependence," CAMA Working Papers 2013-34, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    3. Wenjie Chen & Heiwai Tang, 2014. "The Dragon is Flying West: Micro-Level Evidence of Chinese Outward Direct Investment," Working Papers 142014, Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research.
    4. Sarah Chan, 2019. "China’s Narrowing Current Account Surplus: Evolving Trends and Policy Implications," Economic Alternatives, University of National and World Economy, Sofia, Bulgaria, issue 3, pages 345-359, September.
    5. Alfred Schipke, 2016. "Capital Account Liberalisation and China's Effect on Global Capital Flows," RBA Annual Conference Volume (Discontinued), in: Iris Day & John Simon (ed.),Structural Change in China: Implications for Australia and the World, Reserve Bank of Australia.
    6. Rod Tyers, 2015. "Financial Integration and China's Global Impact," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 15-02, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    7. Rod Tyers & Ying Zhang, 2014. "Real exchange rate determination and the China puzzle," Asian-Pacific Economic Literature, Asia Pacific School of Economics and Government, The Australian National University, vol. 28(2), pages 1-32, November.
    8. Jane Golley & Rod Tyers & Yixiao Zhou, 2016. "Fertility And Savings Contractions In China: Long-Run Global Implications," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 16-24, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    9. Rod Tyers, 2015. "Slower Growth and Vulnerability to Recession: Updating China’s Global Impact," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 15-22, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    10. Yin-Wong Cheung & Risto Herrala, 2014. "China's Capital Controls: Through the Prism of Covered Interest Differentials," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(1), pages 112-134, February.
    11. Rod Tyers & Yixiao Zhou, 2019. "Financial integration and the global effects of China's growth surge," CAMA Working Papers 2019-09, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    12. Yiping Huang & Bijun Wang, 2013. "Investing Overseas Without Moving Factories Abroad: The Case of Chinese Outward Direct Investment," Asian Development Review, MIT Press, vol. 30(1), pages 85-107, March.
    13. Guonan Ma & Robert N. McCauley, 2014. "Financial openness of China and India- Implications for capital account liberalisation," Working Papers 827, Bruegel.
    14. Isha Agarwal & Grace Weishi Gu & Eswar S. Prasad, 2019. "China’s Impact on Global Financial Markets," NBER Working Papers 26311, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. Joyce, Joseph, 2015. "External Balance Sheets as Countercyclical Crisis Buffers," MPRA Paper 66039, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    16. Rod Tyers, 2013. "International Effects of China's Rise and Transition: Neoclassical and Keynesian Perspectives," CAMA Working Papers 2013-44, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    17. Dongzhou Mei & Ting Ji & Liutang Gong, 2020. "Would Currency Appreciation Reduce the Trade Surplus?," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 21(1), pages 85-110, May.
    18. Rod Tyers & Ying Zhang, 2014. "Short Run Effects of The Economic Reform Agenda," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 14-16, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    19. Jane Golley & Rod Tyers & Yixiao Zhou, 2016. "Contractions in Chinese Fertility and Savings: Long run domestic and global implications," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 16-08, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    20. Li, Jian & Strange, Roger & Ning, Lutao & Sutherland, Dylan, 2016. "Outward foreign direct investment and domestic innovation performance: Evidence from China," International Business Review, Elsevier, vol. 25(5), pages 1010-1019.
    21. Huang, Yiping & Ji, Yang, 2017. "How will financial liberalization change the Chinese economy? Lessons from middle-income countries," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 27-45.
    22. Isha Agarwal & Grace Weishi Gu & Eswar Prasad, 2020. "The Determinants of China’s International Portfolio Equity Allocations," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 68(3), pages 643-692, September.
    23. Vipin Arora & Rod Tyers & Ying Zhang, 2014. "Reconstructing the Savings Glut: The Global Implications of Asian Excess Saving," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 14-24, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    24. International Monetary Fund, 2014. "United Kingdom: Selected Issues," IMF Staff Country Reports 2014/234, International Monetary Fund.

  2. Dong He & Wenlang Zhang & Gaofeng Han & Tommy Wu, 2012. "Productivity Growth of the Non-Tradable Sectors in China," Working Papers 082012, Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research.

    Cited by:

    1. Dong He & Wenlang Zhang & Gaofeng Han & Tommy Wu, 2012. "Productivity Growth of the Non-Tradable Sectors in China," Working Papers 082012, Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research.
    2. Yanqun Zhang, 2017. "Productivity in China: past success and future challenges," Asia-Pacific Development Journal, United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), vol. 24(1), pages 1-21, June.
    3. Philippe Bacchetta & Kenza Benhima & Yannick Kalantzis, 2014. "Optimal Exchange Rate Policy in a Growing Semi-Open Economy," Swiss Finance Institute Research Paper Series 14-34, Swiss Finance Institute.
    4. Xiaodong Zhu, 2012. "Understanding China's Growth: Past, Present, and Future," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 26(4), pages 103-124, Fall.
    5. Tang, Heiwai & Wang, Fei & Wang, Zhi, 2014. "The domestic segment of global supply chains in China under state capitalism," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6960, The World Bank.
    6. Kemp, Deanna & Worden, Sandy & Owen, John R., 2016. "Differentiated social risk: Rebound dynamics and sustainability performance in mining," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 19-26.
    7. Kraal, Diane, 2019. "Petroleum industry tax incentives and energy policy implications: A comparison between Australia, Malaysia, Indonesia and Papua New Guinea," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 126(C), pages 212-222.

Articles

  1. Wu, Tommy T., 2015. "Firm heterogeneity, trade, multinationals, and growth: A quantitative evaluation," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 97(2), pages 359-375.

    Cited by:

    1. Colin Davis & Laixun Zhao, 2019. "How do business startup modes affect economic growth?," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 52(4), pages 1755-1781, November.
    2. Yuko Imura, 2019. "Reassessing Trade Barriers with Global Value Chains," Staff Working Papers 19-19, Bank of Canada.
    3. Kishi, Keiichi & Okada, Keisuke, 2018. "Trade Liberalization, Technology Diffusion, and Productivity," MPRA Paper 88597, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Kishi, Keiichi & Okada, Keisuke, 2021. "The impact of trade liberalization on productivity distribution under the presence of technology diffusion and innovation," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 128(C).

  2. Dong He & Wenlang Zhang & Gaofeng Han & Tommy Wu, 2014. "Productivity Growth of the Nontradable Sectors in China," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 18(4), pages 655-666, November.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Dong He & Lillian Cheung & Wenlang Zhang & Tommy Wu, 2012. "How would Capital Account Liberalization Affect China's Capital Flows and the Renminbi Real Exchange Rates?," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 20(6), pages 29-54, November.
    See citations under working paper version above.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 3 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (2) 2012-03-28 2014-09-29
  2. NEP-OPM: Open Economy Macroeconomics (2) 2012-05-02 2014-09-29
  3. NEP-TRA: Transition Economics (2) 2012-03-28 2012-05-02
  4. NEP-CNA: China (1) 2014-09-29
  5. NEP-DEV: Development (1) 2012-03-28
  6. NEP-GER: German Papers (1) 2014-09-29
  7. NEP-GRO: Economic Growth (1) 2014-09-29

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