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Tim Willems

Personal Details

First Name:Tim
Middle Name:
Last Name:Willems
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pwi194
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
https://sites.google.com/site/twillems85/

Affiliation

International Monetary Fund (IMF)

Washington, District of Columbia (United States)
http://www.imf.org/

: (202) 623-7000
(202) 623-4661
700 19th Street, N.W., Washington DC 20431
RePEc:edi:imfffus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Monique Newiak & Tim Willems, 2017. "Evaluating the Impact of Non-Financial IMF Programs Using the Synthetic Control Method," IMF Working Papers 17/109, International Monetary Fund.
  2. Larcom, Shaun & Rauch, Ferdinand & Willems, Tim, 2015. "The Benefits of Forced Experimentation: Striking Evidence from the London Underground Network," CEPR Discussion Papers 10854, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Shaun Larcom & Ferdinand Rauch & Tim Willems, 2015. "The upside of London Tube strikes," CentrePiece - The Magazine for Economic Performance 455, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  4. Tim Willems & Shaun Larcom & Mare Sarr, 2014. "Dictators Walking the Mogadishu Line: How Men Become Monsters and Monsters Become Men," Economics Series Working Papers 701, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  5. van Wijnbergen, Sweder & Willems, Tim, 2014. "Learning dynamics and support for economic reforms : why good news can be bad," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6973, The World Bank.
  6. Tim Willems, 2014. "You Can Go Your Own Way: Explaining Partisan Support for Independence," Economics Series Working Papers 717, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  7. Sweder van Wijnbergen & Tim Willems, 2013. "Optimal Learning on Climate Change: Why climate skeptics should reduce emissions," OxCarre Working Papers 111, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.
  8. Tim Willems & Shaun Larcom & Mare Sarr, 2013. "What shall we do with the bad dictator?," Economics Series Working Papers 671, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  9. Tim Willems, 2013. "Actively Learning by Pricing: A Model of an Experimenting Seller," Economics Series Working Papers 687, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  10. Tim Willems, 2013. "Political Accountability and Policy Experimentation: Why to Elect Left-Handed Politicians?," Economics Series Working Papers 647, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  11. Sweder van Wijnbergen & Tim Willems, 2012. "Learning Dynamics and the Support for Economic Reforms: Why Good News can be Bad," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 12-043/2, Tinbergen Institute.
  12. Alessandro Gobbi & Tim Willems, 2011. "Identifying US Monetary Policy Shocks through Sign Restrictions in Dollarized Countries," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 11-145/2, Tinbergen Institute.
  13. Tim Willems, 2011. "Using Dollarized Countries to Analyze the Effects of US Monetary Policy Shocks," 2011 Meeting Papers 200, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  14. Tim Willems, 2010. "Labor Market Matching under Imperfect Information," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 10-098/2, Tinbergen Institute, revised 13 May 2011.
  15. Tim Willems, 2010. "What are the Effects of Monetary Policy Shocks? Evidence from Dollarized Countries," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 10-099/2, Tinbergen Institute, revised 25 Mar 2013.
  16. Tim Willems & Sweder van Wijnbergen, 2009. "Imperfect Information, Lagged Labor Adjustment and the Great Moderation," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 09-063/2, Tinbergen Institute, revised 18 Apr 2012.
  17. Tim Willems, 2009. "Visualizing the Invisible: Estimating the New Keynesian Output Gap via a Bayesian Approach," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 09-074/2, Tinbergen Institute, revised 26 Mar 2010.

Articles

  1. Shaun Larcom & Ferdinand Rauch & Tim Willems, 2017. "The Benefits of Forced Experimentation: Striking Evidence from the London Underground Network," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 132(4), pages 2019-2055.
  2. Tim Willems, 2017. "Actively Learning by Pricing: A Model of an Experimenting Seller," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 127(604), pages 2216-2239, September.
  3. Beck-Friis, Peder & Willems, Tim, 2017. "Dissecting fiscal multipliers under the fiscal theory of the price level," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 62-83.
  4. Sweder J. G. van Wijnbergen & Tim Willems, 2016. "Learning Dynamics and Support for Economic Reforms: Why Good News Can Be Bad," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 30(1), pages 1-23.
  5. van Wijnbergen, Sweder & Willems, Tim, 2015. "Optimal learning on climate change: Why climate skeptics should reduce emissions," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 17-33.
  6. Sweder van Wijnbergen & Tim Willems, 2013. "Imperfect information, lagged labour adjustment, and the Great Moderation," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 65(2), pages 219-239, April.
  7. Willems, Tim, 2013. "Analyzing the effects of US monetary policy shocks in dollarized countries," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 101-115.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Larcom, Shaun & Rauch, Ferdinand & Willems, Tim, 2015. "The Benefits of Forced Experimentation: Striking Evidence from the London Underground Network," CEPR Discussion Papers 10854, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

    Cited by:

    1. Beestermöller, Matthias, 2017. "Striking Evidence? Demand Persistence for Inter-City Buses from German Railway Strikes," Discussion Papers in Economics 31768, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
    2. Andrew T. Ching & Tülin Erdem & Michael P. Keane, 2016. "Empirical Models of Learning Dynamics: A Survey of Recent Developments," Economics Papers 2016-W12, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
    3. Drew Fudenberg & David K Levine, 2016. "Whither Game Theory?," Levine's Working Paper Archive 786969000000001307, David K. Levine.

  2. van Wijnbergen, Sweder & Willems, Tim, 2014. "Learning dynamics and support for economic reforms : why good news can be bad," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6973, The World Bank.

    Cited by:

    1. Oscar Calvo-Gonzalez & Barbara Cunha & Riccardo Trezzi, 2017. "When Winners Feel Like Losers: Evidence from an Energy Subsidy Reform," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 31(2), pages 329-350.
    2. John Morrow & Michael Carter, 2013. "Left, Right, Left: Income, Learning and Political Dynamics," NBER Working Papers 19498, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  3. Tim Willems, 2014. "You Can Go Your Own Way: Explaining Partisan Support for Independence," Economics Series Working Papers 717, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Xavier Cuadras Morató & Toni Rodon, 2017. "The dog that didn’t bark: on the effect of the Great Recession on the surge of secessionism," Economics Working Papers 1569, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.

  4. Sweder van Wijnbergen & Tim Willems, 2013. "Optimal Learning on Climate Change: Why climate skeptics should reduce emissions," OxCarre Working Papers 111, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.

    Cited by:

    1. Tatiana Kiseleva, 2016. "Heterogeneous Beliefs and Climate Catastrophes," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 65(3), pages 599-622, November.
    2. In Chang Hwang & Richard S.J. Tol & Marjan W. Hofkes, 2013. "Active Learning about Climate Change," Working Paper Series 6513, Department of Economics, University of Sussex.
    3. Ahlvik, Lassi & Hyytiäinen, Kari, 2015. "Value of adaptation in water protection — Economic impacts of uncertain climate change in the Baltic Sea," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 231-240.
    4. Rezai, Armon & van der Ploeg, Frederick, 2017. "Climate policies under climate model uncertainty: Max-min and min-max regret," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(S1), pages 4-16.
    5. Armon Rezai & Rick van der Ploeg, 2017. "Climate Policies under Climate Model Uncertainty: Max-Min and Min-Max Regret," CESifo Working Paper Series 6626, CESifo Group Munich.

  5. Tim Willems & Shaun Larcom & Mare Sarr, 2013. "What shall we do with the bad dictator?," Economics Series Working Papers 671, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Shaun Larcom & Mare Sarr & Tim Willems, 2014. "Dictators Walking the Mogadishu Line: How Men Become Monsters and Monsters Become Men," HiCN Working Papers 176, Households in Conflict Network.

  6. Tim Willems, 2013. "Actively Learning by Pricing: A Model of an Experimenting Seller," Economics Series Working Papers 687, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Cosmin Ilut & Rosen Valchev & Nicolas Vincent, 2016. "Paralyzed by Fear: Rigid and Discrete Pricing under Demand Uncertainty," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 940, Boston College Department of Economics.
    2. Sweder van Wijnbergen & Tim Willems, 2013. "Optimal Learning on Climate Change: Why climate skeptics should reduce emissions," OxCarre Working Papers 111, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.
    3. Isaac Baley & Julio A. Blanco, 2016. "Menu costs, uncertainty cycles, and the propagation of nominal shocks," Economics Working Papers 1532, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    4. Chen Yeh & David Argente, 2016. "A Menu Cost Model with Price Experimentation," 2016 Meeting Papers 1515, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    5. Tim Willems, 2013. "Political Accountability and Policy Experimentation: Why to Elect Left-Handed Politicians?," Economics Series Working Papers 647, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.

  7. Tim Willems, 2013. "Political Accountability and Policy Experimentation: Why to Elect Left-Handed Politicians?," Economics Series Working Papers 647, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Xie, Yinxi & Xie, Yang, 2017. "Machiavellian experimentation," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(4), pages 685-711.

  8. Sweder van Wijnbergen & Tim Willems, 2012. "Learning Dynamics and the Support for Economic Reforms: Why Good News can be Bad," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 12-043/2, Tinbergen Institute.

    Cited by:

    1. Morrow, John & Carter, Michael R., 2017. "Learning about the prospects for mobility: Economic and political dynamics following fundamental policy reform," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 155(C), pages 38-53.

  9. Alessandro Gobbi & Tim Willems, 2011. "Identifying US Monetary Policy Shocks through Sign Restrictions in Dollarized Countries," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 11-145/2, Tinbergen Institute.

    Cited by:

    1. Tim Willems, 2011. "Using Dollarized Countries to Analyze the Effects of US Monetary Policy Shocks," 2011 Meeting Papers 200, Society for Economic Dynamics.

  10. Tim Willems, 2011. "Using Dollarized Countries to Analyze the Effects of US Monetary Policy Shocks," 2011 Meeting Papers 200, Society for Economic Dynamics.

    Cited by:

    1. Alessandro Gobbi & Tim Willems, 2011. "Identifying US Monetary Policy Shocks through Sign Restrictions in Dollarized Countries," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 11-145/2, Tinbergen Institute.
    2. Yoshiyuki Fukuda & Yuki Kimura & Nao Sudo & Hiroshi Ugai, 2013. "Cross-country Transmission Effect of the U.S. Monetary Shock under Global Integration," Bank of Japan Working Paper Series 13-E-16, Bank of Japan.

  11. Tim Willems, 2010. "Labor Market Matching under Imperfect Information," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 10-098/2, Tinbergen Institute, revised 13 May 2011.

    Cited by:

    1. Christian Glocker, 2012. "Unemployment compensation and aggregate fluctuations," International Review of Economics, Springer;Happiness Economics and Interpersonal Relations (HEIRS), vol. 59(1), pages 21-39, March.

  12. Tim Willems & Sweder van Wijnbergen, 2009. "Imperfect Information, Lagged Labor Adjustment and the Great Moderation," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 09-063/2, Tinbergen Institute, revised 18 Apr 2012.

    Cited by:

    1. Kevin x.d. Huang & Jie Chen & Zhe Li & Jianfei Sun, 2014. "Financial Conditions and Slow Recoveries," Vanderbilt University Department of Economics Working Papers 14-00004, Vanderbilt University Department of Economics.
    2. Michael W. Elsby & Bart Hobijn & Aysegul Sahin, 2010. "The Labor Market in the Great Recession," NBER Working Papers 15979, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Tim Willems, 2010. "Labor Market Matching under Imperfect Information," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 10-098/2, Tinbergen Institute, revised 13 May 2011.

  13. Tim Willems, 2009. "Visualizing the Invisible: Estimating the New Keynesian Output Gap via a Bayesian Approach," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 09-074/2, Tinbergen Institute, revised 26 Mar 2010.

    Cited by:

    1. Fethi Ogunc & Cagri Sarikaya, 2011. "Gorunmez Ama Hissedilmez Degil : Turkiye'de Cikti Acigi," Central Bank Review, Research and Monetary Policy Department, Central Bank of the Republic of Turkey, vol. 11(2), pages 15-28.
    2. Daniel Kienzler & Kai D. Schmid, 2014. "Hysteresis in Potential Output and Monetary Policy," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 61(4), pages 371-396, September.
    3. Kienzler, Daniel & Schmid, Kai Daniel, 2013. "Monetary policy and hysteresis in potential output," University of Tuebingen Working Papers in Economics and Finance 55, University of Tuebingen, Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences.

Articles

  1. Shaun Larcom & Ferdinand Rauch & Tim Willems, 2017. "The Benefits of Forced Experimentation: Striking Evidence from the London Underground Network," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 132(4), pages 2019-2055.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Tim Willems, 2017. "Actively Learning by Pricing: A Model of an Experimenting Seller," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 127(604), pages 2216-2239, September.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Sweder J. G. van Wijnbergen & Tim Willems, 2016. "Learning Dynamics and Support for Economic Reforms: Why Good News Can Be Bad," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 30(1), pages 1-23. See citations under working paper version above.
  4. van Wijnbergen, Sweder & Willems, Tim, 2015. "Optimal learning on climate change: Why climate skeptics should reduce emissions," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 17-33.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  5. Sweder van Wijnbergen & Tim Willems, 2013. "Imperfect information, lagged labour adjustment, and the Great Moderation," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 65(2), pages 219-239, April.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  6. Willems, Tim, 2013. "Analyzing the effects of US monetary policy shocks in dollarized countries," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 101-115.

    Cited by:

    1. Feldkircher, Martin & Huber, Florian, 2016. "The international transmission of US shocks—Evidence from Bayesian global vector autoregressions," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 81(C), pages 167-188.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 15 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-POL: Positive Political Economics (5) 2013-03-23 2014-05-04 2014-07-05 2014-08-16 2016-08-14. Author is listed
  2. NEP-TRE: Transport Economics (4) 2015-09-26 2015-10-04 2015-10-10 2015-11-15. Author is listed
  3. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (4) 2015-09-26 2015-10-04 2015-10-10 2015-11-15. Author is listed
  4. NEP-CBA: Central Banking (2) 2009-08-16 2009-09-11
  5. NEP-CDM: Collective Decision-Making (2) 2013-03-23 2014-08-16
  6. NEP-CIS: Confederation of Independent States (2) 2014-08-16 2014-08-20
  7. NEP-NET: Network Economics (2) 2015-09-26 2015-10-10
  8. NEP-TRA: Transition Economics (2) 2012-05-08 2014-08-02
  9. NEP-BEC: Business Economics (1) 2009-08-16
  10. NEP-DGE: Dynamic General Equilibrium (1) 2011-02-26
  11. NEP-ENE: Energy Economics (1) 2012-09-03
  12. NEP-ENV: Environmental Economics (1) 2012-09-03
  13. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (1) 2011-02-26
  14. NEP-LAW: Law & Economics (1) 2013-11-02
  15. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (1) 2011-02-26
  16. NEP-ORE: Operations Research (1) 2014-07-05
  17. NEP-PKE: Post Keynesian Economics (1) 2012-09-03
  18. NEP-RES: Resource Economics (1) 2012-09-03

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