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Kelly Foley

Personal Details

First Name:Kelly
Middle Name:
Last Name:Foley
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pfo151
Twitter: @foley_kelly
Terminal Degree:2008 Vancouver School of Economics; University of British Columbia (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Department of Economics
University of Saskatchewan

Saskatoon, Canada
http://www.arts.usask.ca/economics/
RePEc:edi:deuskca (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Donn. L. Feir & Kelly Foley & Maggie E.C. Jones, 2022. "Heterogeneous Returns to Active Labour Market Programs for Indigenous Populations," NBER Working Papers 30158, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Foley, Kelly, 2017. "The gender gap in university participation: What role do skills and parents play?," CLEF Working Paper Series 8, Canadian Labour Economics Forum (CLEF), University of Waterloo.
  3. Foley, Kelly & Groes, Fane, 2016. "Field of study and the decision to delay university," CLEF Working Paper Series 4, Canadian Labour Economics Forum (CLEF), University of Waterloo.
  4. Kelly Foley & Giovanni Gallipoli & David A. Green, 2009. "Ability, parental valuation of education and the high school dropout decision," IFS Working Papers W09/21, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  5. Phillip K. Robins & Charles Michalopoulos & Kelly Foley, 2006. "Are Two Carrots Better Than One? The Effects of Adding Employment Services to Financial Incentive Programs for Welfare Recipients," Working Papers 0713, University of Miami, Department of Economics, revised Oct 2007.

Articles

  1. Kelly Foley & Fane Groes, 2021. "Admissions Constraints and the Decision to Delay University," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 123(2), pages 478-507, April.
  2. Donna Feir & Kelly Foley & Maggie E. C. Jones, 2021. "The Distributional Impacts of Active Labor Market Programs for Indigenous Populations," AEA Papers and Proceedings, American Economic Association, vol. 111, pages 216-220, May.
  3. Kelly Foley, 2019. "The gender gap in university enrolment: Do parents play a role beyond investing in skills?," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 52(2), pages 441-489, May.
  4. Kelly Foley & Giovanni Gallipoli & David A. Green, 2014. "Ability, Parental Valuation of Education, and the High School Dropout Decision," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 49(4), pages 906-944.
  5. Kelly Foley, 2012. "Can neighbourhoods change the decisions of youth on the margins of university participation?," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 45(1), pages 167-188, February.
  6. Philip K. Robins & Charles Michalopoulos & Kelly Foley, 2008. "Are Two Carrots Better Than One? The Effects of Adding Employment Services to Financial Incentive Programs for Welfare Recipients," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 61(3), pages 410-423, April.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Kelly Foley & Giovanni Gallipoli & David A. Green, 2009. "Ability, parental valuation of education and the high school dropout decision," IFS Working Papers W09/21, Institute for Fiscal Studies.

    Cited by:

    1. Michael J. Kottelenberg & Steven F. Lehrer, 2016. "How Skills and Parental Valuation of Education Influence Human Capital Acquisition and Early Labor Market Return to Human Capital in Canada," NBER Chapters, in: Small Differences II: Public Policies in Canada and the United States, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Eleonora Bertoni & Michele Di Maio & Vasco Molini & Roberto Nisticò, 2018. "Education is Forbidden: The Effect of the Boko Haram Conflict on Education in North-East Nigeria," CSEF Working Papers 495, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy.
    3. Torberg Falch & Bjarne Strom, 2011. "Schools, Ability, and the Socioeconomic Gradient in Education Choices," CESifo Working Paper Series 3313, CESifo.
    4. Orazio Attanasio & Lina Cardona Sosa & Carlos Medina & Costas Meghir & Christian Manuel Posso-Suárez, 2021. "Long Term Effects of Cash Transfer Programs in Colombia," NBER Working Papers 29056, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Nicholas Trachter, 2015. "Stepping stone and option value in a model of postsecondary education," Quantitative Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 6(1), pages 223-256, March.
    6. Christofides, Louis N. & Hoy, Michael & Milla, Joniada & Stengos, Thanasis, 2012. "Grades, Aspirations and Post-Secondary Education Outcomes," IZA Discussion Papers 6867, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    7. Kelly Foley, 2019. "The gender gap in university enrolment: Do parents play a role beyond investing in skills?," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 52(2), pages 441-489, May.
    8. Falch, Torberg & Lujala, Päivi & Strøm, Bjarne, 2013. "Geographical constraints and educational attainment," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(1), pages 164-176.
    9. Louis N. Christofides & Michael Hoy & Joniada Milla & Thanasis Stengos, 2012. "The Implication of Peer and Parental Influences on University Attendance: A Gender Comparison," Working Papers 1201, University of Guelph, Department of Economics and Finance.
    10. Kunz, Johannes S. & Staub, Kevin E., 2016. "Subjective Completion Beliefs and the Demand for Post-Secondary Education," IZA Discussion Papers 10344, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    11. Hou, Feng & Picot, Garnett, 2013. "Why Immigrant Background Matters for University Participation: A Comparison of Switzerland and Canada," CLSSRN working papers clsrn_admin-2013-50, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 22 Nov 2013.
    12. Kunz, Johannes S. & Staub, Kevin E., 2020. "Early subjective completion beliefs and the demand for post-secondary education," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 177(C), pages 34-55.
    13. Donna Feir, 2015. "The Intergenerational Effect of Forcible Assimilation Policy on Education," Department Discussion Papers 1501, Department of Economics, University of Victoria.
    14. Foley, Kelly, 2017. "The gender gap in university participation: What role do skills and parents play?," CLEF Working Paper Series 8, Canadian Labour Economics Forum (CLEF), University of Waterloo.
    15. Green, David & Kesselman, Jonathan Rhys & Tedds, Lindsay M., 2021. "Covering All the Basics: Reforms for a More Just Society," MPRA Paper 105902, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    16. Garnett Picot & Feng Hou, 2013. "Why Immigrant Background Matters for University Participation: A Comparison of Switzerland and Canada," International Migration Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(3), pages 612-642, September.
    17. Coelli, Michael & Green, David A., 2012. "Leadership effects: school principals and student outcomes," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 92-109.

  2. Phillip K. Robins & Charles Michalopoulos & Kelly Foley, 2006. "Are Two Carrots Better Than One? The Effects of Adding Employment Services to Financial Incentive Programs for Welfare Recipients," Working Papers 0713, University of Miami, Department of Economics, revised Oct 2007.

    Cited by:

    1. Dorsett, Richard, 2014. "The effect of temporary in-work support on employment retention: Evidence from a field experiment," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 61-71.
    2. Alexander Spermann, 2015. "How to fight long-term unemployment: lessons from Germany," IZA Journal of Labor Policy, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-15, December.
    3. Christopher J. O'Leary, 2015. "Use of Unemployment Insurance and Public Employment Services after Leaving Welfare," Upjohn Working Papers 15-235, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    4. Dr Richard Dorsett, 2013. "Can Post-Employment Services Combined with Financial Incentives Improve Employment Retention for Welfare Recipients? Evidence from the Texas Employment Retention and Advancement Evaluation," National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) Discussion Papers 409, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.
    5. Richard Hendra & James Riccio & Richard Dorsett & Philip Robins, 2015. "Breaking the low pay, no pay cycle: the effects of the UK Employment Retention and Advancement programme," IZA Journal of Labor Policy, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-32, December.
    6. Nathan Berg & Todd Gabel, 2013. "Effects of New Welfare Reform Strategies on Welfare Participation: Microdata Estimates from Canada," Working Papers 1304, University of Otago, Department of Economics, revised Feb 2013.
    7. Stephen A. Wandner, 2016. "Wage Insurance as a Policy Option in the United States," Upjohn Working Papers 16-250, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.

Articles

  1. Donna Feir & Kelly Foley & Maggie E. C. Jones, 2021. "The Distributional Impacts of Active Labor Market Programs for Indigenous Populations," AEA Papers and Proceedings, American Economic Association, vol. 111, pages 216-220, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Barber, Michael & Jones, Maggie E.C., 2021. "Inequalities in test scores between Indigenous and non-Indigenous youth in Canada," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 83(C).

  2. Kelly Foley & Giovanni Gallipoli & David A. Green, 2014. "Ability, Parental Valuation of Education, and the High School Dropout Decision," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 49(4), pages 906-944.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Kelly Foley, 2012. "Can neighbourhoods change the decisions of youth on the margins of university participation?," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 45(1), pages 167-188, February.

    Cited by:

    1. Eiji Yamamura, 2015. "Norm for redistribution, social capital, and perceived tax burden: comparison between highand low-income households," Review of Economics and Institutions, Università di Perugia, vol. 6(2).
    2. Coelli, Michael & Green, David A., 2012. "Leadership effects: school principals and student outcomes," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 92-109.

  4. Philip K. Robins & Charles Michalopoulos & Kelly Foley, 2008. "Are Two Carrots Better Than One? The Effects of Adding Employment Services to Financial Incentive Programs for Welfare Recipients," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 61(3), pages 410-423, April.
    See citations under working paper version above.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 3 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (3) 2010-04-17 2010-05-08 2022-07-25
  2. NEP-EDU: Education (2) 2010-04-17 2010-05-08
  3. NEP-IAS: Insurance Economics (1) 2010-05-08
  4. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2010-05-08

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