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The Implication of Peer and Parental Influences on University Attendance: A Gender Comparison

Author

Listed:
  • Louis N. Christofides

    () (Universities of Cyprus and Guelph.)

  • Michael Hoy

    () (University of Guelph.)

  • Joniada Milla

    () (University of Guelph.)

  • Thanasis Stengos

    () (University of Guelph.)

Abstract

In this study, we explore the effect of peers and family on University attendance and graduation. We find that parental expectations and peer effects have a significant impact on the educational outcomes which operates through the interconnectedness between grades and aspirations during high school. Apart from this indirect path, parents and peers directly influence educational outcomes. Policy measures that exploit especially the parental influence on the child may be useful to balance the gender gap of University graduates in Canada.

Suggested Citation

  • Louis N. Christofides & Michael Hoy & Joniada Milla & Thanasis Stengos, 2012. "The Implication of Peer and Parental Influences on University Attendance: A Gender Comparison," Working Papers 1201, University of Guelph, Department of Economics and Finance.
  • Handle: RePEc:gue:guelph:2012-01.
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    File URL: http://www.uoguelph.ca/economics/sites/uoguelph.ca.economics/files/2012-01.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Andreas Ammermueller & Jörn-Steffen Pischke, 2009. "Peer Effects in European Primary Schools: Evidence from the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 27(3), pages 315-348, July.
    2. Weili Ding & Steven F. Lehrer, 2007. "Do Peers Affect Student Achievement in China's Secondary Schools?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, pages 300-312.
    3. Maria De Paola & Vincenzo Scoppa, 2010. "Peer group effects on the academic performance of Italian students," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(17), pages 2203-2215.
    4. Christofides, Louis N. & Hoy, Michael & Yang, Ling, 2010. "Participation in Canadian Universities: The gender imbalance (1977-2005)," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 400-410, June.
    5. Vincent Boucher & Yann Bramoullé & Habiba Djebbari & Bernard Fortin, 2014. "Do Peers Affect Student Achievement? Evidence From Canada Using Group Size Variation," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 29(1), pages 91-109, January.
    6. Victor Lavy & Analia Schlosser, 2011. "Mechanisms and Impacts of Gender Peer Effects at School," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 3(2), pages 1-33, April.
    7. Corak, Miles & Lipps, Garth & Zhao, John, 2003. "Family Income and Participation in Post-secondary Education," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2003210e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    8. Scott E. Carrell & Richard L. Fullerton & James E. West, 2009. "Does Your Cohort Matter? Measuring Peer Effects in College Achievement," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 27(3), pages 439-464, July.
    9. Kelly Foley & Giovanni Gallipoli & David A. Green, 2014. "Ability, Parental Valuation of Education, and the High School Dropout Decision," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 49(4), pages 906-944.
    10. Lee, Lung-fei, 2007. "Identification and estimation of econometric models with group interactions, contextual factors and fixed effects," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 140(2), pages 333-374, October.
    11. D. Johnson, F. Rahman, 2005. "The Role of Economic Factors, Including the Level of Tuition, in Individual University Participation Decisions in Canada," Working Papers eg0044, Wilfrid Laurier University, Department of Economics, revised 2005.
    12. Eisenkopf, Gerald, 2010. "Peer effects, motivation, and learning," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 364-374, June.
    13. Jane Friesen & Brian Krauth, 2010. "Sorting, peers, and achievement of Aboriginal students in British Columbia," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 43(4), pages 1273-1301, November.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    University Attendance and Graduation; Peer and Parental Influences.;

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • J00 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - General

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