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The Intergenerational Effect of Forcible Assimilation Policy on Education

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Abstract

For nearly a century, the Canadian government separated Indigenous children from their families and placed them in live-in institutions known as residential schools. Many speculate that this policy contributes to the struggles Indigenous children face today. Using a unique confidential data set, I identify the effects of a mother attending a residential school on her children. I find that children whose mother attended residential school fare better along health dimensions and yet worse along educational dimensions. I provide suggestive evidence that these findings are due to residential schooling impacting parenting style and parental attitudes towards education.

Suggested Citation

  • Donna Feir, 2015. "The Intergenerational Effect of Forcible Assimilation Policy on Education," Department Discussion Papers 1501, Department of Economics, University of Victoria.
  • Handle: RePEc:vic:vicddp:1501
    Note: ISSN 1914-2838
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    File URL: http://www.uvic.ca/socialsciences/economics/assets/docs/discussion/DDP1501.pdf
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    1. Donna L. Feir, 2016. "The long-term effects of forcible assimilation policy: The case of Indian boarding schools," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 49(2), pages 433-480, May.
    2. Sharon Maccini & Dean Yang, 2009. "Under the Weather: Health, Schooling, and Economic Consequences of Early-Life Rainfall," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(3), pages 1006-1026, June.
    3. Krishna Pendakur & Ravi Pendakur, 2011. "Aboriginal Income Disparity in Canada," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 37(1), pages 61-83, March.
    4. Flavio Cunha & James J. Heckman & Susanne M. Schennach, 2010. "Estimating the Technology of Cognitive and Noncognitive Skill Formation," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 78(3), pages 883-931, May.
    5. Erik Plug, 2004. "Estimating the Effect of Mother's Schooling on Children's Schooling Using a Sample of Adoptees," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(1), pages 358-368, March.
    6. Kelly Foley & Giovanni Gallipoli & David A. Green, 2014. "Ability, Parental Valuation of Education, and the High School Dropout Decision," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 49(4), pages 906-944.
    7. Thomas Dohmen & Armin Falk & David Huffman & Uwe Sunde, 2012. "The Intergenerational Transmission of Risk and Trust Attitudes," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 79(2), pages 645-677.
    8. Black, Sandra E. & Devereux, Paul J., 2011. "Recent Developments in Intergenerational Mobility," Handbook of Labor Economics, Elsevier.
    9. Donna Feir, 2013. "Size, Structure, and Change: Exploring the Sources of Aboriginal Earnings Gaps in 1995 and 2005," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 39(2), pages 309-334, June.
    10. Barrera, Albino, 1990. "The role of maternal schooling and its interaction with public health programs in child health production," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 69-91, January.
    11. Lindeboom, Maarten & Llena-Nozal, Ana & van der Klaauw, Bas, 2009. "Parental education and child health: Evidence from a schooling reform," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 109-131, January.
    12. Case, Anne & Fertig, Angela & Paxson, Christina, 2005. "The lasting impact of childhood health and circumstance," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(2), pages 365-389, March.
    13. Janet Currie & Enrico Moretti, 2003. "Mother's Education and the Intergenerational Transmission of Human Capital: Evidence from College Openings," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 118(4), pages 1495-1532.
    14. repec:aph:ajpbhl:10.2105/ajph.2013.301479_3 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Flavio Cunha & James J. Heckman, 2008. "Formulating, Identifying and Estimating the Technology of Cognitive and Noncognitive Skill Formation," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 43(4).
    16. Duncan Thomas & John Strauss & Maria-Helena Henriques, 1991. "How Does Mother's Education Affect Child Height?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 26(2), pages 183-211.
    17. Paul Glewwe, 1999. "Why Does Mother's Schooling Raise Child Health in Developing Countries? Evidence from Morocco," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 34(1), pages 124-159.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:spr:soinre:v:137:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s11205-017-1593-5 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Don Drummond & Evan Capeluck & Matthew Calver, 2015. "The Key Challenge for Canadian Public Policy: Generating Inclusive and Sustainable Economic Growth," CSLS Research Reports 2015-11, Centre for the Study of Living Standards.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Education; Stature; Attitudes; Intergenerational; Indigenous Peoples;

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J18 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Public Policy

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