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International Business Cycle and Financial Intermediation

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  • TAMAS Z. CSABAFI
  • MAX GILLMAN
  • RUTHIRA NARAIDOO

Abstract

The paper extends a standard two‐country international real business cycle model to include financial intermediation by banks of loans and government bonds. The paper contributes an explanation for both the United States relative to the Euro‐area, and the United States relative to China, of cross‐country correlations of loan rates, deposit rates, and the loan premia. It shows a type of financial retrenchment for the United States relative to both Europe and China following a negative bank productivity shock, such as during the 2008 crisis. After 2008, results suggest that the Euro‐area has been more financially integrated with the United States, and China less financially integrated.

Suggested Citation

  • Tamas Z. Csabafi & Max Gillman & Ruthira Naraidoo, 2019. "International Business Cycle and Financial Intermediation," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 51(8), pages 2293-2303, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:jmoncb:v:51:y:2019:i:8:p:2293-2303
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/jmcb.12580
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    JEL classification:

    • E13 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Neoclassical
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics

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