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Le Fonctionnement Du Marché Du Travail En Algérie : Population Active Et Emplois Occupés

Author

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  • Moundir LASSASSI

    (CREAD, Algérie)

  • Nacer-eddine HAMMOUDA

    (CREAD, Algérie)

Abstract

In developing countries, particularly in Algeria, the determinants of the integration of individuals to the labor market remain poorly understood. We exploit two employment surveys conducted among Algerian households in 1997 and 2007 by the National Office of Statistics. This work aimed at analyzing the determinants of participation of men and women in economic activities, on the one hand, and also appreciates the role of individual characteristics in the choice of tenure, on the other hand. We use two econometric methods : a binary logistic regression and a segmentation technique. It appears that women's participation in economic activities is logically different from the one of men. For women, human capital (education and vocational training) strongly determines participation to the labor market. For men, it is rather the age which is crucial. In general, participation to the labor force is determined by other factors than individual characteristics, such as household characteristics, household head and location in urban or rural.

Suggested Citation

  • Moundir LASSASSI & Nacer-eddine HAMMOUDA, 2012. "Le Fonctionnement Du Marché Du Travail En Algérie : Population Active Et Emplois Occupés," Region et Developpement, Region et Developpement, LEAD, Universite du Sud - Toulon Var, vol. 35, pages 99-120.
  • Handle: RePEc:tou:journl:v:35:y:2012:p:99-120
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

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    2. Latifa EL BARDIY & Abdeljalil LOUHMADI, 2017. "Human capital and its impact on employment quality: Sector and wage," Journal of Economics and Political Economy, KSP Journals, vol. 4(4), pages 408-419, December.
    3. Hassiba Gherbi & Philippe Adair, 2016. "Femmes et emploi informel dans la wilaya de Béjaia (Algérie) : un modèle probit," Post-Print hal-01683931, HAL.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    LABOUR MARKET; EMPLOYABILITY; OCCUPATIONAL CHOICE; EMPLOYMENT SURVEYS; DISCRETE CHOICE MODELS; ALGERIA.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities
    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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