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The negative consequences of school bullying on academic performance and mitigation through female teacher participation: evidence from Ghana

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  • Shahriar Kibriya
  • Zhicheng Phil Xu
  • Yu Zhang

Abstract

Exploiting data from Ghanaian schools’ eighth grade students collected in 2011, we estimate the causal effects of school bullying on academic achievement and gender-based mitigating approaches by using propensity score matching (PSM) and doubly robust (DR) estimator approach. We find that students victimized by bullying score at least 0.22 standard deviation lower than their peers in a standardized mathematics examination. Meanwhile, we document that the effect of bullying is significantly attenuated in the presence of female teachers in the classroom. These results hold through a set of robustness checks including placebo regressions and matching quality test. We explain the results through gender difference in teaching paradigm and conclude that a feminine management approach in class is required to reduce the effect of bullying.

Suggested Citation

  • Shahriar Kibriya & Zhicheng Phil Xu & Yu Zhang, 2017. "The negative consequences of school bullying on academic performance and mitigation through female teacher participation: evidence from Ghana," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(25), pages 2480-2490, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:49:y:2017:i:25:p:2480-2490
    DOI: 10.1080/00036846.2016.1240350
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Fatema, Naureen & Kibriya, Shahriar, 2017. "Givers of great dinners know few enemies: The impact of household food security on micro-level communal conflict in Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo," 2017 Annual Meeting, July 30-August 1, Chicago, Illinois 258482, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    2. Naureen Fatema & Shahriar Kibriya, 2018. "Givers of great dinners know few enemies: The impact of household food sufficiency and food sharing on low intensity interhousehold and community conflict in Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo," HiCN Working Papers 267, Households in Conflict Network.

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