IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/taf/applec/v36y2004i20p2327-2333.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Empirical regularities in South African consumption patterns

Author

Listed:
  • Saroja Selvanathan
  • E. A. Selvanathan

Abstract

This article investigates a number of empirical regularities in the South African consumption patterns. The data support the following empirical regularities: (1) variability in consumption systematically exceeds the variability in prices; (2) law of demand; (3) income flexibility is about -0.5; (4) Engel's law; and (5) the demand hypotheses, demand homogeneity and Slutsky symmetry are acceptable. In contrast to the findings for a number of other countries, another important empirical regularity that consumer's utility function is additive is rejected for the South African consumers. Based on the implied demand elasticity estimates from the preferred model, it is found that food, housing and medical care are necessities, and clothing, furniture, transport and recreation are luxuries and demand for all the commodities are price inelastic.

Suggested Citation

  • Saroja Selvanathan & E. A. Selvanathan, 2004. "Empirical regularities in South African consumption patterns," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(20), pages 2327-2333.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:36:y:2004:i:20:p:2327-2333
    DOI: 10.1080/0003684042000280328
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/0003684042000280328
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Chung, Ching-Fan & Lopez, Elena, 1988. "A regional analysis of food consumption in Spain," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 209-213.
    2. Keller, W.J. & Van Driel, J., 1985. "Differential consumer demand systems," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 375-390.
    3. Clements, Kenneth W., 1982. "Divisia moments of Australian consumption," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 9(1), pages 43-48.
    4. Kenneth Clements & Wana Yang & Dongling Chen, 2001. "The matrix approach to evaluating demand equations," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(8), pages 957-967.
    5. Finke, Renate & Flood, Lennart R. & Theil, Henri, 1984. "Maximum likelihood and instrumental variable estimation of a consumer demand system for Japan and Sweden," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 15(1-2), pages 13-19.
    6. Clements, Kenneth W & Selvanathan, Antony & Selvanathan, Saroja, 1996. "Applied Demand Analysis: A Survey," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 72(216), pages 63-81, March.
    7. Deaton, Angus S & Muellbauer, John, 1980. "An Almost Ideal Demand System," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(3), pages 312-326, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Andrea Saayman & Isabel Cortés-Jiménez, 2013. "Modelling Intercontinental Tourism Consumption in South Africa: A Systems-of-Equations Approach," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 81(4), pages 538-560, December.
    2. Emerson Marinho & Maurício Benegas & Flávio Ataliba, 2005. "Vantagem Comparativa Dinâmica E Crescimento Endógeno Numa Economia Com Dois Setores: Agrícola E Industrial," Anais do XXXIII Encontro Nacional de Economia [Proceedings of the 33th Brazilian Economics Meeting] 141, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pósgraduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics].
    3. Kaus, Wolfhard, 2013. "Conspicuous consumption and “race”: Evidence from South Africa," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 100(1), pages 63-73.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:36:y:2004:i:20:p:2327-2333. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Chris Longhurst). General contact details of provider: http://www.tandfonline.com/RAEC20 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.