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Meat And Fish Demand In Tunisia: Economic And Socio-Demographic Factors Effects


  • Dhraief, Mohamed Zied
  • Oueslati, Meriem
  • Dhehibi, Boubaker


The aim of the paper is to analyze the impact of socio-economic and demographic variables on the demand for meat and fish for Tunisian consumers. This study is one of the first applications in Tunisia with respect to the demand for meat and fish that simultaneously covers two important aspects: the non-imposition of, a priori, a functional form and the use of cross-section data including demographic and socioeconomic variables. The main results show that meat and fish consumption patterns by age, level of income and level of education are relatively different as regards to the economic factors (food expenditure and price). The changes in demographic and economic characteristics are influencing the changes in meat and fish demand.

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  • Dhraief, Mohamed Zied & Oueslati, Meriem & Dhehibi, Boubaker, 2012. "Meat And Fish Demand In Tunisia: Economic And Socio-Demographic Factors Effects," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126432, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae12:126432

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    1. Dhehibi, B. & Gil, J. M., 2003. "Forecasting food demand in Tunisia under alternative pricing policies," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 167-186, April.
    2. Gracia, A. & Albisu, Luis Miguel, 1998. "The demand for meat and fish in Spain: Urban and rural areas," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 19(3), December.
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    9. Dhehibi, Boubaker & Lachaal, Lassaad & Chebil, Ali, 2005. "Demand Analysis for Fish in Tunisia: An Empirical Approach," 2005 International Congress, August 23-27, 2005, Copenhagen, Denmark 24715, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
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    13. Gil, José M.ª & Dhehibi, B. & Angulo, Ana Maria, 2001. "La demanda de carnes y pescados en Túnez: un enfoque dinámico," Revista Española de Estudios Agrosociales y Pesqueros, Ministerio de Medio Ambiente, Rural y Marino (formerly Ministry of Agriculture), issue 190.
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    meat and fish demand; food demand systems; synthetic model; economic and socio-demographic factors.; Consumer/Household Economics; Demand and Price Analysis; Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety; Political Economy;

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