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Nutrient Effects On Consumer Demand: A Panel Data Approach

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  • Dhehibi, Boubaker
  • Gil, Jose Maria
  • Angulo, Ana Maria

Abstract

The objective of this paper is to analyze the Spanish demand for food taking into account the consumer's concern about the relationship between food diet and health. This concern is forcing food demand analysts to assume that consumer utility is a function of nutrients instead of simply the food products themselves. A CBS demand model has been considered to model the new demand function obtained, which is estimated with a complete panel data set. Ten broad categories, nine nutrients and the most relevant socio-economic variables have been considered. Finally, after an appropriate model selection strategy, expenditure, price and nutrient elasticities, as well as main sociodemographic effects, have been calculated.

Suggested Citation

  • Dhehibi, Boubaker & Gil, Jose Maria & Angulo, Ana Maria, 2003. "Nutrient Effects On Consumer Demand: A Panel Data Approach," 2003 Annual Meeting, August 16-22, 2003, Durban, South Africa 25881, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae03:25881
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/25881/files/cp03dh04.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kuo Huang, 1999. "Effects of food prices and consumer income on nutrient availability," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(3), pages 367-380.
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    3. Martin Browning & M. Dolores Collado, 2001. "The Response of Expenditures to Anticipated Income Changes: Panel Data Estimates," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(3), pages 681-692, June.
    4. White, Halbert, 1980. "A Heteroskedasticity-Consistent Covariance Matrix Estimator and a Direct Test for Heteroskedasticity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(4), pages 817-838, May.
    5. Subramanian, Shankar & Deaton, Angus, 1996. "The Demand for Food and Calories," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 104(1), pages 133-162, February.
    6. Cramer, J S, 1973. "Interaction of Income and Price in Consumer Demand," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 14(2), pages 351-363, June.
    7. Ramezani, Cyrus A., 1995. "Determinants Of Nutrient Demand: A Nonparametric Analysis," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 1-13, July.
    8. X. M. Gao & Timothy Richards & Albert Kagan, 1997. "A latent variable model of consumer taste determination and taste change for complex carbohydrates," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(12), pages 1643-1654.
    9. Barten, Anton P, 1977. "The Systems of Consumer Demand Functions Approach: A Review," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 45(1), pages 23-51, January.
    10. Monia Ben Kaabia & Ana M. Angulo, 2001. "Health information and the demand for meat in Spain," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 28(4), pages 499-518, December.
    11. Capps, Oral, Jr. & Schmitz, John D., 1991. "A Recognition Of Health And Nutrition Factors In Food Demand Analysis," Western Journal of Agricultural Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 1-15, July.
    12. Keller, W.J. & Van Driel, J., 1985. "Differential consumer demand systems," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 375-390.
    13. Andrew Chesher, 1998. "Individual demands from household aggregates: time and age variation in the composition of diet," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(5), pages 505-524.
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