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Democracy and foreign direct investment at the industry level: evidence for US multinationals

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  • David Kucera

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  • Marco Principi

Abstract

Theories of multinational enterprises emphasize that foreign direct investment (FDI) is undertaken in different industries for different reasons, yet studies of the effects of democracy on FDI most commonly use aggregate-level FDI data. This paper evaluates US FDI outflows to 15 industries (eight manufacturing, seven nonmanufacturing) in 54 countries in a linear dynamic panel-data gravity FDI model using a “system” generalized method of moments estimator and three widely used democracy indicators. At the aggregate-level, we estimate a positive effect of democracy on FDI, consistent with most prior studies. At the industry level, we estimate larger positive effects of democracy on FDI for service than manufacturing industries, particularly for finance and insurance and information, and negative effects for mining and oil and gas extraction. Copyright Kiel Institute 2014

Suggested Citation

  • David Kucera & Marco Principi, 2014. "Democracy and foreign direct investment at the industry level: evidence for US multinationals," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 150(3), pages 595-617, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:weltar:v:150:y:2014:i:3:p:595-617
    DOI: 10.1007/s10290-013-0183-0
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Susan Ariel Aaronson, "undated". "Governance Spillovers of Labour Provisions in Free Trade Agreements," Working Papers 2017-2, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
    2. Jean Lacroix & Pierre-Guillaume Méon & Khalid Sekkat, 2017. "Do democratic transitions attract foreign investors and how fast?," Working Papers CEB 17-006, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    3. International Organisation, 2017. "Handbook on Assessment of Labour Provisons in Trade and Investment Arrangements," Working Papers id:11929, eSocialSciences.
    4. Bürgi Bonanomi, Elisabeth & Elsig, Manfred & Espa, Ilaria, 2015. "The Commodity Sector and Related Governance Challenges from a Sustainable Development Perspective: The Example of Switzerland Current Research Gaps," Papers 865, World Trade Institute.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Democracy; Foreign direct investment; Natural resources; D72; F23; J51;

    JEL classification:

    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • J51 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor-Management Relations, Trade Unions, and Collective Bargaining - - - Trade Unions: Objectives, Structure, and Effects

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