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Political Regime and Human Capital: A Cross-Country Analysis

  • Jeroen Klomp


  • Jakob Haan
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    We examine the relationship between different dimensions of the political regime in place and human capital using a two-step structural equation model. In the first step, we employ factor analysis on 16 human capital indicators to construct two new human capital measures (basic and advanced human capital). In the second step, we estimate the impact of our political variables on human capital, using a cross-sectional structural model for some 100 countries. We conclude that democracy is positively related to basic human capital, while regime instability has a negative link with basic human capital. Governance has a positive relationship with advanced human capital, while government instability has a negative link with advanced human capital. Finally, we also find an indirect positive effect of governance and democracy on both types of human capital through their effect on income. Copyright The Author(s) 2013

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    Article provided by Springer in its journal Social Indicators Research.

    Volume (Year): 111 (2013)
    Issue (Month): 1 (March)
    Pages: 45-73

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    Handle: RePEc:spr:soinre:v:111:y:2013:i:1:p:45-73
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