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The United States Congress and IMF financing, 1944–2009

  • J. Broz


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    Article provided by Springer in its journal The Review of International Organizations.

    Volume (Year): 6 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 3 (September)
    Pages: 341-368

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    Handle: RePEc:spr:revint:v:6:y:2011:i:3:p:341-368
    DOI: 10.1007/s11558-011-9108-7
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    1. Lohmann, Susanne & O'Halloran, Sharyn, 1994. "Divided government and U.S. trade policy: theory and evidence," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 48(04), pages 595-632, September.
    2. Allan Meltzer, 2011. "The IMF returns," The Review of International Organizations, Springer, vol. 6(3), pages 443-452, September.
    3. Milner, Helen V. & Tingley, Dustin H., 2011. "Who Supports Global Economic Engagement? The Sources of Preferences in American Foreign Economic Policy," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 65(01), pages 37-68, January.
    4. Bird, Graham, 1996. "The International Monetary Fund and developing countries: a review of the evidence and policy options," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 50(03), pages 477-511, June.
    5. J. Broz, 2008. "Congressional voting on funding the international financial institutions," The Review of International Organizations, Springer, vol. 3(4), pages 351-374, December.
    6. Fleck, Robert K. & Kilby, Christopher & Fleck, Robert K., 2000. "Reassessing the Role of Constituency in Congressional Voting," Vassar College Department of Economics Working Paper Series 51, Vassar College Department of Economics.
    7. Fordham, Benjamin O. & McKeown, Timothy J., 2003. "Selection and Influence: Interest Groups and Congressional Voting on Trade Policy," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 57(03), pages 519-549, June.
    8. Tomz, Michael & Wittenberg, Jason & King, Gary, 2003. "Clarify: Software for Interpreting and Presenting Statistical Results," Journal of Statistical Software, Foundation for Open Access Statistics, vol. 8(i01).
    9. Irwin, Douglas A & Kroszner, Randall S, 1999. "Interests, Institutions, and Ideology in Securing Policy Change: The Republican Conversion to Trade Liberalization after Smoot-Hawley," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 42(2), pages 643-73, October.
    10. Kenneth Rogoff, 1999. "International Institutions for Reducing Global Financial Instability," NBER Working Papers 7265, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Huizinga, H.P. & Demirguc-Kunt, A., 1993. "Official credits to developing countries : Implicit transfers to the banks," Other publications TiSEM 3e86ba61-dde4-4c9c-bd2c-e, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    12. Ai, Chunrong & Norton, Edward C., 2003. "Interaction terms in logit and probit models," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 80(1), pages 123-129, July.
    13. Edward C. Norton & Hua Wang & Chunrong Ai, 2004. "Computing interaction effects and standard errors in logit and probit models," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 4(2), pages 154-167, June.
    14. Ladewig, Jeffrey W., 2006. "Domestic Influences on International Trade Policy: Factor Mobility in the United States, 1963 to 1992," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 60(01), pages 69-103, January.
    15. Gould, Erica R., 2003. "Money Talks: Supplementary Financiers and International Monetary Fund Conditionality," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 57(03), pages 551-586, June.
    16. Helen V. Milner & B. Peter Rosendorff, 1996. "Trade Negotiations, Information And Domestic Politics: The Role Of Domestic Groups," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 8(2), pages 145-189, 07.
    17. Rogowski, Ronald, 1987. "Trade and the variety of democratic institutions," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 41(02), pages 203-223, March.
    18. Christoph Moser & Jan-Egbert Sturm, 2011. "Explaining IMF lending decisions after the Cold War," The Review of International Organizations, Springer, vol. 6(3), pages 307-340, September.
    19. Broz, J. Lawrence & Hawes, Michael Brewster, 2006. "Congressional Politics of Financing the International Monetary Fund," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 60(02), pages 367-399, April.
    20. Michael D. Bordo & Harold James, 2000. "The International Monetary Fund: Its Present Role in Historical Perspective," NBER Working Papers 7724, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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