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Italian economic dualism and convergence clubs at regional level

Listed author(s):
  • Juan Brida

    ()

  • Nicolás Garrido

    ()

  • Francesco Mureddu

    ()

This paper gives a contribution to the debate on regional convergence by comparing the long run prediction of convergence clubs introduced by Quah (1996 and 1997) with the actual observed dynamics of the Italian regions during the period 1970–2004. To this end we analyze the evolution of per capita income levels for the Italian regions using a non-traditional (non-parametric) statistical model. In addition we segment the set of economies by the mean of hierarchical clustering methodologies and compare the trajectories of the regions by introducing different notions of distance. The general conclusion is that the average distance identifies a clear division between a high performance club consisting of regions from the Center North, and a low performance club composed by regions from the South and islands. The presence of a cluster composed by Center North regions is substantially confirmed by the distance correlation analysis, suggesting an homogeneous response to external shocks. By contrast Southern regions display the same dynamical evolution but difference in co-movements. Our analysis provides hints about the fundamentals that link the regions in their process of divergence. In fact the performance clubs pattern we discovered reflects the distribution of economic activities as well as the structural attributes of the regional economies. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11135-012-9779-z
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Article provided by Springer in its journal Quality & Quantity.

Volume (Year): 48 (2014)
Issue (Month): 1 (January)
Pages: 439-456

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Handle: RePEc:spr:qualqt:v:48:y:2014:i:1:p:439-456
DOI: 10.1007/s11135-012-9779-z
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Order Information: Web: http://www.springer.com/economics/journal/11135

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  1. Sala-i-Martin, Xavier, 1995. "The Classical Approach to Convergence Analysis," CEPR Discussion Papers 1254, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Xavier Sala-i-Martin, 1994. "Cross-sectional regressions and the empirics of economic growth," Economics Working Papers 79, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
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  4. Paul Krugman, 1990. "Increasing Returns and Economic Geography," NBER Working Papers 3275, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  7. Danny Quah, 1996. "Twin peaks : growth and convergence in models of distribution dynamics," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 2278, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  8. Summers, Robert & Heston, Alan, 1984. "Improved International Comparisons of Real Product and Its Composition: 1950-1980," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 30(2), pages 207-262, June.
  9. Graziani, Augusto, 1978. "The Mezzogiorno in the Italian Economy," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 2(4), pages 355-372, December.
  10. Robert Summers & Alan Heston, 1991. "The Penn World Table (Mark 5): An Expanded Set of International Comparisons, 1950–1988," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 327-368.
  11. Nazrul Islam, 2003. "What have We Learnt from the Convergence Debate?," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 17(3), pages 309-362, 07.
  12. Robert J. Barro & Xavier Sala-i-Martin, 1990. "Economic Growth and Convergence across The United States," NBER Working Papers 3419, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Quah, Danny, 1997. "Empirics for Growth and Distribution: Stratification, Polarization, and Convergence Clubs," CEPR Discussion Papers 1586, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  14. Danny Quah, 1996. "Twin Peaks: Growth and Convergence in Models of Distribution Dynamics," CEP Discussion Papers dp0280, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  15. Robert Tibshirani & Guenther Walther & Trevor Hastie, 2001. "Estimating the number of clusters in a data set via the gap statistic," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series B, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 63(2), pages 411-423.
  16. Ivan Etzo, 2011. "The Determinants Of The Recent Interregional Migration Flows In Italy: A Panel Data Analysis," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(5), pages 948-966, December.
  17. R. Cellini & A. Scorcu, 1995. "How many Italies?," Working Papers 215, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
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