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Variations on economic convergence: The case of the United States

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  • Cristina D. Checherita

Abstract

This paper tests the hypothesis of "conditional &bgr;-convergence" in per capita income across the United States by extending the neoclassical growth model to incorporate public capital, government taxation, and human capital, and controlling empirically for technology growth. We expand the period of analysis from the late 1980s when studies using public capital stock have stopped, investigate spatial variation across the United States under various cross-sectional and panel spatial models, and tackle the issue of nonlinearities. All model "variations" provide evidence of economic convergence across the United States over the period 1960-2005. Copyright (c) 2008 the author(s). Journal compilation (c) 2008 RSAI.

Suggested Citation

  • Cristina D. Checherita, 2009. "Variations on economic convergence: The case of the United States," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 88(2), pages 259-278, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:presci:v:88:y:2009:i:2:p:259-278
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    1. repec:rrs:journl:v:11:y:2017:i:1:p:1-17 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Juan Brida & Nicolás Garrido & Francesco Mureddu, 2014. "Italian economic dualism and convergence clubs at regional level," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, pages 439-456.
    3. Up Lim, 2016. "Regional income club convergence in US BEA economic areas: a spatial switching regression approach," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, pages 273-294.
    4. BRIDA, Juan Gabriel & GARRIDo, Nicolas & MUREDDU, Francesco, 2014. "Club Performance Dynamics At Italian Regional Level," Regional and Sectoral Economic Studies, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 14(1), pages 47-68.
    5. repec:jes:journl:y:2017:v:8:p:127-146 is not listed on IDEAS

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