IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/spr/jopoec/v22y2009i4p1005-1024.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Self-selection in migration and returns to unobservables

Author

Listed:
  • Benoit Dostie

    ()

  • Pierre Léger

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Benoit Dostie & Pierre Léger, 2009. "Self-selection in migration and returns to unobservables," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 22(4), pages 1005-1024, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:22:y:2009:i:4:p:1005-1024
    DOI: 10.1007/s00148-008-0235-2
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s00148-008-0235-2
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Gary L. Hunt & Richard E. Mueller, 2004. "North American Migration: Returns to Skill, Border Effects, and Mobility Costs," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 86(4), pages 988-1007, November.
    2. Chris Robinson & Nigel Tomes, 1982. "Self-Selection and Interprovincial Migration in Canada," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 15(3), pages 474-502, August.
    3. Borjas, George J. & Bronars, Stephen G. & Trejo, Stephen J., 1992. "Self-selection and internal migration in the United States," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 159-185, September.
    4. Dionne, Georges & Langlois, Alain & Lemire, Nicole, 1987. "More on the geographical distribution of physicians," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(4), pages 365-374, December.
    5. Roger Axelsson & Olle Westerlund, 1998. "A panel study of migration, self-selection and household real income," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 11(1), pages 113-126.
    6. Daniel Chiquiar & Gordon H. Hanson, 2005. "International Migration, Self-Selection, and the Distribution of Wages: Evidence from Mexico and the United States," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 113(2), pages 239-281, April.
    7. Pissarides, Christopher A & Wadsworth, Jonathan, 1989. "Unemployment and the Inter-regional Mobility of Labour," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 99(397), pages 739-755, September.
    8. A. D. Roy, 1951. "Some Thoughts On The Distribution Of Earnings," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 3(2), pages 135-146.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Andrés Rodríguez-Pose & Vassilis Tselios, 2010. "Returns to migration, education and externalities in the European Union," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 89(2), pages 411-434, June.
    2. Échevin, Damien & Fortin, Bernard, 2014. "Physician payment mechanisms, hospital length of stay and risk of readmission: Evidence from a natural experiment," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 112-124.
    3. Venhorst, V. & Cörvers, F., 2015. "Entry into working life: Spatial mobility and the job match quality of higher-educated graduates," ROA Research Memorandum 003, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
    4. Catia Batista & Francesco Cestari, 2016. "Migrant intentions to return: The role of migrant social networks," NOVAFRICA Working Paper Series wp1602, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Faculdade de Economia, NOVAFRICA.
    5. Catia Batista & Francesco Cestari, 2016. "Migrant intentions to return: The role of migrant social networks," FEUNL Working Paper Series novaf:wp1602, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Faculdade de Economia.
    6. Mu, Chunzhou, 2015. "The age profile of the location decision of Australian general practitioners," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 142(C), pages 183-193.
    7. Dijk, J. van & Broersma, L. & Edzes, A.J.E. & Venhorst, V.A, 2011. "Brain drain of brain gain? Hoger opgeleiden in grote steden in Nederland," Research Reports vavenhorst, University of Groningen, Urban and Regional Studies Institute (URSI).
    8. Boman, Anders, 2012. "Employment effects of extended geographic scope in job search," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(5), pages 643-652.
    9. McDonald, James Ted & Worswick, Christopher, 2012. "The migration decisions of physicians in Canada: The roles of immigrant status and spousal characteristics," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(9), pages 1581-1588.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Migration; Self-selection; Earnings; Longitudinal data; J24; J61; C23;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:22:y:2009:i:4:p:1005-1024. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.