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Who gets to cross the border? The impact of mobility restrictions on labor flows in the West Bank

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  • Adnan, Wifag

Abstract

This paper examines the impact of labor mobility restrictions such as border closures, physical obstacles and unequally accessed ID cards and work permits on the labor flows of West Bank residents. The results demonstrate that for Jerusalem residents, mobility restrictions reduce out-migration but they are much more pronounced in impeding out-migration to Israel proper than to Israeli settlements. Additionally, an increase in the number of border closures per quarter has a positive and significant impact on the odds of facing unemployment for all groups, but is especially high for migrant workers residing outside of Jerusalem. A lower bound estimate of the economic cost of a 50day increase in the number of border closures (1.78 standard deviations) per quarter is about USD 1.7 million per day in the subsequent quarter. The paper also concludes that the determinants of out-migration differ from those of return-migration. For example, while border closures and unemployment status during previous visits are strong determinants of out-migration, the decision to return is driven by relatively low wages and lacking the necessary legal documentation to enter Israel. The findings in this paper are consistent with international studies that ascribe inefficiency in labor markets to restrictions on labor mobility across regions.

Suggested Citation

  • Adnan, Wifag, 2015. "Who gets to cross the border? The impact of mobility restrictions on labor flows in the West Bank," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 86-99.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:labeco:v:34:y:2015:i:c:p:86-99
    DOI: 10.1016/j.labeco.2015.03.016
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:jeborg:v:146:y:2018:i:c:p:222-247 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Adnan, Wifag & Miaari, Sami H., 2018. "Voting Patterns and the Gender Wage Gap," IZA Discussion Papers 11261, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. repec:gam:jecnmx:v:6:y:2018:i:2:p:29-:d:149744 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Belal Fallah, 2017. "The Economic Response of Rural Areas to Local Supply Shock: Evidence From Palestine," Working Papers 1108, Economic Research Forum, revised 06 2017.
    5. Michele Di Maio & Roberto Nisticò, 2016. "The Effect of Parental Job Loss on Child School Dropout: Evidence from the Occupied Palestinian Territories," CSEF Working Papers 456, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy, revised 06 Feb 2018.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Labor flows; Mobility restrictions; Out-migration; Return-migration; Conditional logit; West Bank;

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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