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The demand-side dynamics of entrant heterogeneity

Listed author(s):
  • Lalit Manral

    ()

Differences in demand conditions between the early and later parts of the demand-growth stage of an industry’s life-cycle generate three sets of hypotheses about industry entrants. These differences in demand conditions explain why later industry entrants differ in their vertical scope, in their product offerings, and in their geographic scope. The hypotheses are tested in the context of the post-divestiture US Long Distance Telecommunications Services industry during 1984–1996. The tests control for firm-specific explanations of industry entrants’ characteristics and the results are consistent with the main hypotheses. Copyright Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s00191-015-0401-0
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Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Evolutionary Economics.

Volume (Year): 25 (2015)
Issue (Month): 2 (April)
Pages: 401-445

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Handle: RePEc:spr:joevec:v:25:y:2015:i:2:p:401-445
DOI: 10.1007/s00191-015-0401-0
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