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Understanding the timing of 'fast-second' entry and the relevance of capabilities in invention vs. commercialization

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  • Lee, Gwendolyn K.

Abstract

This paper analyzes the way a firm can control its entry timing after missing the opportunity to pioneer an emerging market. The findings, based on a panel of 224 potential entrants, reveal that alignment with invention and commercialization capabilities of early entrants has positive effects on the timing of 'fast-second' entry. When comparing invention and commercialization capabilities, the latter dominate. In addition, subsequent alignment as the market develops, as opposed to initial alignment at the beginning of market emergence, is associated with the reconfiguration of capabilities and is the more important determinant of entry timing.

Suggested Citation

  • Lee, Gwendolyn K., 2009. "Understanding the timing of 'fast-second' entry and the relevance of capabilities in invention vs. commercialization," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 86-95, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:respol:v:38:y:2009:i:1:p:86-95
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Friebe, Christian A. & von Flotow, Paschen & Täube, Florian A., 2014. "Exploring technology diffusion in emerging markets – the role of public policy for wind energy," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 217-226.
    2. Najda-Janoszka, Marta, 2017. "Tracking Windows of Opportunity along the Industry Development Trajectory," MPRA Paper 83438, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. repec:wsi:ijimxx:v:21:y:2017:i:04:n:s1363919617500402 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Bento, Nuno & Fontes, Margarida, 2015. "The construction of a new technological innovation system in a follower country: Wind energy in Portugal," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 99(C), pages 197-210.

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