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Churn, Baby, Churn: Strategic Dynamics Among Dominant and Fringe Firms in a Segmented Industry

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  • John M. de Figueiredo

    () (Anderson Graduate School of Management, University of California at Los Angeles, 110 Westwood Plaza, Suite D508, Los Angeles, California 90095-1481)

  • Brian S. Silverman

    () (Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto, 105 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 3E6)

Abstract

This paper integrates and extends the literatures on industry evolution and dominant firms to develop a dynamic theory of dominant and fringe competitive interaction in a segmented industry. It argues that a dominant firm, seeing contraction of growth in its current segment(s), enters new segments in which it can exploit its technological strengths, but that are sufficiently distant to avoid cannibalization. The dominant firm acts as a low-cost Stackelberg leader, driving down prices and triggering a sales takeoff in the new segment. We identify a "churn" effect associated with dominant firm entry: fringe firms that precede the dominant firm into the segment tend to exit the segment, while new fringe firms enter, causing a net increase in the number of firms in the segment. As the segment matures and sales decline in the segment, the process repeats itself. We examine the predictions of the theory with a study of price, quantity, entry, and exit across 24 product classes in the desktop laser printer industry from 1984 to 1996. Using descriptive statistics, hazard rate models, and panel data methods, we find empirical support for the theoretical predictions.

Suggested Citation

  • John M. de Figueiredo & Brian S. Silverman, 2007. "Churn, Baby, Churn: Strategic Dynamics Among Dominant and Fringe Firms in a Segmented Industry," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 53(4), pages 632-650, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:inm:ormnsc:v:53:y:2007:i:4:p:632-650
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/mnsc.1060.0674
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Lalit Manral, 2015. "The demand-side dynamics of entrant heterogeneity," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 25(2), pages 401-445, April.
    2. Claussen, Jörg & Kretschmer, Tobias & Spengler, Thomas, 2010. "Market leadership through technology – Backward compatibility in the U.S. Handheld Video Game Industry," Discussion Papers in Business Administration 12716, University of Munich, Munich School of Management.
    3. Huang, Xiao & Sosic, Greys, 2010. "Analysis of industry equilibria in models with sustaining and disruptive technology," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 207(1), pages 238-248, November.
    4. JP Eggers & Michal Grajek & Tobias Kretschmer, 2011. "Performance implications of core and complementary pre-entry experience: The role of consumer heterogeneity in mobile telephony," ESMT Research Working Papers ESMT-11-03 (R2), ESMT European School of Management and Technology, revised 29 May 2012.
    5. April M. Franco & MB Sarkar & Rajshree Agarwal & Raj Echambadi, 2009. "Swift and Smart: The Moderating Effects of Technological Capabilities on the Market Pioneering-Firm Survival Relationship," Management Science, INFORMS, pages 1842-1860.
    6. James D. Campbell & April Mitchell Franco, 2013. "Cannibalization, Innovation and Spin-outs," DRUID Working Papers 13-11, DRUID, Copenhagen Business School, Department of Industrial Economics and Strategy/Aalborg University, Department of Business Studies.
    7. John M. de Figueiredo & Brian S. Silverman, 2012. "Firm Survival and Industry Evolution in Vertically Related Populations," Management Science, INFORMS, pages 1632-1650.

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